Stonestrider

Seek and Find The Sacred


April 20, 2017

Mount Spruce/Monroe State Forest

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Location: Monroe, Massachusetts/USA

Elevation: 2,730 feet

Note: It’s good to know that every so often you can come across a simple trail. Depending on where you are, you can encounter a host of obstacles and unanticipated factors, especially in New England, which might hinder your way. For example, in early Spring, tree’s may have fallen during the previous Winter before rangers can re-designate the trails with new markers. This can have you miles into a trail expecting a rewarding view, only to be completely off-trail and configuring a way back. For the dedicated hiker in Winter, snow may cover an entire route. Just last week on a trail in New Hampshire a man had the bright idea to bring an M16 rifle several miles into Purgatory Falls Trail; he opened-fire along the river, all while people were hiking, which mind you, is totally LEGAL in New Hampshire. These things should not hinder your dedication to seeking the beautiful and meaningful high points in the landscape, but it should teach you to increase your awareness that the rules do change in different environments/countries/states. This is why it is a relief to arrive at a place like Monroe State Forest, set in a very special region of Massachusetts, on the beautiful boarder of southern Vermont. Here you will find a clear and straight trail heading directly to the best view in the entire region. This place is a rolling set of small mountains that vividly encapsulates the medium-scale hiking elevations of central New England. My friend Jon Bent, who is a local, and expert on these hills, has told me that the growth here is not ‘old’ at all, but rather, it is recent (150 years old), which contradicts several sources about these woods. Whatever the case may be with these massive trees, they are a batch of somewhat rare trees for Massachusetts; such as the Yellow Birch, American Basswood, Beech, Red Spruce, and towering White Pine. It is my belief that the crafted stones were here LONG BEFORE any trees, as they were present on the landscapes in Celtic ranges. Navigating to the best entry point for this trail requires locating Tilda Hill road in the town of Florida, Massachusetts, which eventually becomes the indistinctly named “Main Road”. There is a sign for Monroe State Forest at the intersection of “Main Road” and Raycroft Road. Raycroft Road is actually a rugged dirt path and the trail for this hike, which elevates gradually into Monroe Forest. You can park your car just passed the Monroe State Forest sign at the turn-off towards Raycroft Road, beside the flowing Dunbar Brook on your left. Simply park your vehicle and head straight up the wide dirt path, without veering in either direction, all the way to Hunt Hill porch. It’s about 2.5 miles to reach the vista. You will actually come to the top of the hike and re-enter a short path directly in front of you leading a bit downward again for 2 minutes before opening up to Hunt Hill Porch. It’s a striking view. On this day someone wrote on one of the porch stones “All good things in all good time.” Perfect spot to contemplate this.Mount Spruce is actually a secondary priority compared to the view at Hunt Hill, here at Monroe. Hunt Hill should be your goal. After discovering the Hunt Hill vista you can turn back towards the main trail and follow the westerly paths, to the left, heading towards Mount Spruce. The pathways  heading away from the main trail are narrower, with towering trees and hedges. These trails continue along hilly glades and knolls that display shafts of cinematic sunlight, and scenes where a stop for water and rest in the Forest is a great idea. Looping down to the main trail again you will be heading generally back towards Dunbar Brook. At about the mid-point of the Raycroft Road main trail,  there is an easterly path of forest with those beautiful White Pines, all continuing down to Dunbar Brook and beyond into the lower valley lakes. 

Within this glade of White Pines are some compelling free-standing boulders, with sliced faces and rounded rears, like many Celtic territorial markers. Look at the face of this 10 ton boulder on the left. It is blatantly flat, looking at it head-on. The view from the side reveals that the boulder looks to have been split, like a knife through butter, with a rounded base at the rear, as shown on the right. What could’ve possible done this? Look at these standing stones with rounded rears at Glenveagh National Park/Ireland (White Diamond Face), and Mount Watatic Mass (Red and Gold Leaf coloring on stone). It’s the same exact principle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dunbar Brook becomes a beautiful set of small waterfalls dancing through the rocks and boulders. You can follow this stream with confidence if you so choose, navigating both down and back, with small pathways along the side to help, only be prepared to climb a bit along the boulders.

From the vista at Hunt Hill down to the Car Park at the head of Dunbar Brook are Neolithic stones all throughout the forest. Hundreds of zigzagging stone-linings, and squared-out spaces with areas that look like hearth-centers in ancient living centers. Below is an image of what looks like the symmetrical foundation to what was once an ancient living space, with the hearth-stones in the center; presumably for a fire. Look at the leveling of this stonework, which is identical to corbel layering in Celtic ancient spaces. Here’s closer look at the scale of these stones against the landscape, which stands about 4 feet tall. It raises serious questions about the idea that Colonial farmers just randomly decided to waste their Summer seasons utilizing all their resources to build structures like this, and without even an ounce of explanation or claim.  Something much more complicated is taking place in these Forests and Mountains. For certain so many people will look and say in a most bored fashion, “Yeah o.k, big deal, it’s just a stonewall…” But the point is where it is, and the style and size of it.  These stones are in the middle of a Forest and run literally everywhere. They are part of a grander network of connecting stones that do not mark, say, quartered fields, or farmhouses from the colonial period; they zigzag, and often times connect to rivers, like cords connecting to a power source. If a reader doesn’t see that it is riveting to possibly piece together the idea that someone was engineering the entire landscape for the purpose of harnessing energy in antiquity, than just stop reading now. These discoveries are changing the way we conceive of “monuments”. The culture that did this monumentalized the entire landscape. The whole thing was once synergized by a connecting system of natural energy producers, like flowing water and Sun. Most people just don’t understand. The same concept of  energy connectors and crystalized power sources within your phone, is the same exact principal being discovered on the New England landscape. Above is yet another image of stone-linings zigzagging through the woods. In the forefront of the image, and the back, are stones beyond counting. The odds that these linings connect to the flowing water of Dunbar Brook, just beyond, are 99 to 1. That’s what it is starting to look like; that’s where the physical evidence takes us. All of this happens under beautiful White Pines, tall and fair, on this eastern extension from the main trail here at Monroe State Forest.Heading back to the beginning of the trail where your car is parked, you can spend some time at a focal point of Dunbar Brook. There is a hollowed-out section of stream with a small waterfall coming around the side of this central pool, and it is serene. In the image below, the stream looks to have been redirected around the pool, to the left, then continuing to flow down the valley. So now you’re thinking that “redirecting” the flow of water at a rocky stream seems impossible right? Take a look at this beautiful waterfall in Donegal, northern Ireland. Aside from the incredibly crafted stones above the fall, which practically look like a faucet fixture funneling the water to an exact point, is an absolutely crafted side-stream to the left. The stones of this side-stream are like a perfect staircase, in width and leveling, allowing the water to mingle with the main flow in front of it in a perfectly sectioned process. This waterfall in Donegal is wild, completely indigenous, without even a path connecting it to the road; the work that was done to it, was done in antiquity, and with great skill. And there are many other places like this, with skilled crafting, alignments, and fitted stones. (See ‘Bears Den’ in the New England Section of Stonestrider.com if you are interested in more water engineering in antiquity.) Monroe State Forest is a simple hike to the vista at Hunt Hill, surrounded by enchanted forestry and networks of Neolithic stones. The awareness of this beautiful factor can change the way we read landscapes. Improve your landscape literacy and hike Monroe State Forest. Pictures and images are o.k, but the point of these articles is to get people there for themselves. Spring is here, so go for it! Seeing is believing. Thanks for reading.


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February 24, 2017

Ashburnham State Forest Reserve

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Location: Ashburnham, Massachusetts/USA

Note: The natural beauty of trails in New England, particularly in Fall, is such a blessing for those seeking a break from the suburban inundation that is the trademark of world wide modernism. That’s a mouthful of fancy words for those just seeking a peaceful, compelling, and pleasant space to hike, which Ashuburnham’ definitely is. The paths here are wide and welcoming, with golden leaves literally lining the forest floor. Mingled into these golden pathways are collages of foliage, rusty-red and green with pillar size Pines, Ash, Elms, Birches, Oaks, and Maples arching over the pathways.  There are several trails in Ashburnham’, most of them running north to south towards Mount Watatic Reserve about 7 miles away. The Lincoln Pond Trail is the main route through Ashburnham’ which is gladly featured in this article. This is the ideal place to keep in mind that in so many stories forests are places of enchantment. From Grimm’s fairytales to Shakespeare’s magical midsummer backdrops, historically in literary works forests have been places where extraordinary things have occurred. Places like Ashburnham’ are a superfine example of how the most delightful and unassuming woods can hold subtle secrets within, secrets that are somewhat hard to explain and bordering on the magical dimensions so many stories try to relate.  Native American stories are also part of this landscape, which have unfortunately been lost to history. It should be recognized that Native stories were deeply connected to specific spots. Elevations were considered “places of power”, and various landmarks had histories behind them that often imparted a moral memory for future generations.  All these things are literally stirring in a place like Ashburnham’. Simply put, there’s a lot more going on in the forests of the world than just wood, water, soil and stone; if you go deep enough, often enough, you will see. 

The southern entrance of Lincoln Pond Trail is a quiet country road with no visible street sign. It is just off the intersection of Hastings and Stowell roads, and is a bit hard to find, so bring your navigation device. This short country-road leads to the small car-park area, just beyond a farmhouse and picturesque barn at the end of the lane.  As soon as you begin striding into the entry path there is a feeling of watchfulness. This feeling is far from fictional; ‘watchfulness’ is the unforced moment when you realize that you are not necessarily observing the forest, but rather, the forest is actually observing you. It can take years for some people to pinpoint this moment, while others acknowledge it within a few short hikes. It is a lucky feeling to achieve if you can. The misty entrance at Lincoln Pond Trail is the embodiment of “the old-growth ‘gateway'”, where the possibility of this feeling emerges in each bending branch and whistling breeze. With a swift mist moving through the deep multicolored forest, you might begin to grasp that hiking is anything but primitive “walking”, it is a Godsend treatment for your sensory. 

Entering Ashburnham’ in late Fall of 2016 I realized that this would be my last real hike of the year. I had now seen roughly 30 state park nature Reserves in the last 4 years, inclusive of 5 countries and 6 States, (among those various countries). Since walking into Kinnitty Forest for the first time, in the heart of Ireland 4 years ago, where my girlfriend stumbled on a seashell at the top of a mountain, my life has never been the same. I discovered that if you stroll into even the most unassuming looking woods (even in the middle if Ireland), if you look deep enough, or climb high enough, you may very well find something truly wonderful that could change your outlook on the world. This was subject matter they didn’t teach us in schools, even at universities, which made it all the more stunning for me. Eventually, if thing s like this happen you have to ask why? Why does every region that has yet to be suburbanized, including most of the surviving forests and mountain elevations, contain megalithic stones, ‘linings’ and cairns that are practically hidden in the landscape? why is it not brought up in our text books? It has finally become clear to me. The first culture on Earth, the first layer of culture, is a Megalithic Culture; This was an ‘engineering capable’, technologically proficient, culture. The second layer is the Native period. The third layer is the Colonial period; then the fourth layer is the Industrial movement, and the fifth Postmodern. If this is correct, than in places like Ashburnham’, where there are no layers to cover up and interfere with this first layer of Megalithic Culture, the cultural stones will be discernible. The trails here should reveal stonework just beneath an ocean of golden leaves, like a visibly enlightened landscape that guards the greatest stylized historic secret on earth. It’s like hiding a sword in a stone, deep in the forest of some forgotten place, just waiting to be pulled up. 

   To begin, as you wander in, right away, on both sides of the trail, are beautiful stone-linings that follow the path. This is the sign of a truly ancient Reserve. Following these stones will most often lead you to something even more compelling, a rocky ledge or waterfall, which is a pattern that is also true in the fantastic Celtic Reserves to the east, across the Atlantic Ocean.  Along this main ‘artery of stone’ is a tour of fantastic expressions, along with what looks like a powerfully regenerative place, a wonderfully healthy old growth forest. Groves of baby Pines flourish here, which can be seen about a quarter mile into this trail, just off the path. It indicates an ecosphere of high quality nutrients in the earth and air. The positive benefits of these energies for people is not dramatic hokum; the effects on human beings are equally reviving, and certainly far more beneficial than say, walking on the pavements of even the “nicest cities”.   

The classic stone-linings in Ashbunrham’ have another quality that makes the case for an increasingly in-depth explanation as to what their purpose(s) may have been. There are places in the ‘linings’ that are clearly and distinctly leading to specific boulders. Just like the head of a large serpent, many of the stones are capitalized with a free-standing boulder that seems to have been placed directly into this construct, intentionally. The idea that stone-linings, which run for dozens of miles through the landscape at Ashburnham’, were simply built along glacially placed boulders sitting at random just doesn’t make sense. The stone-linings create an order in the forest; they are a logical expression of control and directionality. Basing an entire network of megalithic stones on random ‘glacially placed’ boulders seems opposite to the entire point for a culture that actuated meaning int he deep woods by placing lines of massive stones. The boulders were most likely inserted into the stone-linings, just like other lessor stones, however hard that is to believe. And this still doesn’t answer the question, why? Below is an example of just such an expression. This classic stone-lining, which is partially covered by the foliage, runs straight into this massive boulder, like the head of a snake. Even the picture doesn’t do the scene the justice it compels in person.

Lincoln Pond Trail is a comfortably gradual incline that twists through glades of differing densities and hues. It is entirely pleasant strolling through. Eventually the golden leaves are left behind for Maple glades, with red burning red leaves rolling at your feet by the thousands. Hiking here is like twisting through a tunnel of colors and variations. The effect of color and variation on the brain is a positively stimulating and beneficial one, refreshing the senses with a refined palate for natural beauty. 

Drifting into this rouge dimension there are other amazing changes to see.  A literal matrix of stone pathways begins to emerge; these are stones of a style I had never seen before just beneath the foliage. About 40 yards deeper into the woods, parallel to the trail, is a three-foot wide, by three-foot in height, lane of inserted stones that rolls like a wave through the old-growth woods. This is thousands of stones in an obvious statement which is boldly protruding above the ground, like a tunneled highway for Beavers. It continues for perhaps 400 yards beyond this spot. The meaning of this second style of stone through this gorgeous stretch of Maple groves is an additional mystery, but it is simply an addition to an entire set of mysteries that emerge here. Continuing along the northern line of these stones, the ground slowly elevates the path into a more unique part of the forest at Ashburnham’. This mysterious network blossoms into more obvious statements. It is hard to tell if certain areas are ancient living spaces, or focal points for some kind of work place; or perhaps this is an engineering statement with a functionality yet to be deciphered? The one thing that blatantly stands out here is that there is an entire culture of stonework beneath the leaves. If this were a Celtic area the stones and their layout would be much more visible, as the greenery of indigenous Celtic ranges, and forests, are most often layered with minimal skins of glowing moss, but not much more. Look at the right angles of this stonework below. It is clearly defining the space with stones, but the purpose is hard to decipher. These statements run for miles through the woods. Once upon a time these stones dominated the entire landscape uninterrupted. It is conceivable that the stones were here before the forest even existed.

About 150 yards from this spot, off trail, is an entrenched set of stones with the look of a habitable dwelling. These dwellings can be found in crafted spaces much more distinct than here at Ashburnham’, yet to find this indicates that this place was definitely endeared and highly valued as “livable”. The stones below show a corner-section of what was once someones home, most likely in the beginning of history.

To add to the mystique of this spot, just 10 yards way is an extension of these stones that is symmetrically aligned, with a distinct quartz boulder centering the scene of entirely granite stones. The area is obviously in ruins, but there is an alignment to the overall remaining arrangement. It should be noted at this point, that none of this has anything to do with Colonial farmers. A cartographical recording of this area, a full archaeological review, will reveal a massive stone-network that is the basis of an entirely engineered landscape, harnessing sunlight in certain spaces, creating enclosures for harvested plants, connecting fixtures for navigational purposes, and relegating certain areas for irrigation. This is the case for almost every forest in western Massachusetts. Simply put, there’s a Megalithic Culture under there.

Ashburnham’ is a forest without a mountain in its midst. This makes for a more pleasant stroll over the course of about 3 miles of pathways.  It does have slightly a elevated clearing, one 60 foot high ledge that sits like a rocky bald head just above the small valley to the north before reaching Watatic Mountain. as you climb up the forest peals aways and a beautifully rounded rocky ledge emerges, with what looks like molded slabs that feel hollow beneath your feet. The mist culminates here, as if you were walking into a cloud. Seasoned hikers eventually learn that scenes like this are priceless, and relate a side to New England trails that is real and authentic, akin to the dreamy visions that must have prompted stories like ‘The Headless Horseman” which famously took place in the New England forests of Upstate New York, where the woods were an entirely enchanted zone not to be taken lightly for Colonial settlers. This mound feels like another planet as you make for the top.

The giant slabs here seemed ‘custom fashioned’ to the hill; they are arched and fit perfectly to the rounded sides of the broad knoll while becoming more flat towards the flattened top. This fits an awesome pattern of higher elevations where ledges are carved-out and specifically rocky, while being surrounded by soil-rich old-growth forest. In short, it’s like a rocky island on an ocean of soil. I will not go so far as to say that these stones were crafted, but the surreality to the scene, the suddenness of these uniquely fitting stones along the rounded path, seems to have some kind of secret to it. To add to the mysterious situation, at the top of the rocky knoll, which is about two miles into the forest, a massive stone-lining of a style and consistency I had yet to see anywhere, even in Ireland, Wales, or Scotland, emerged rolling directly over the mound. Each stone was proportionally equal, and at least five times bigger than the average stone used in the two types of other stone-linings already tracing the woods below. Each stone looked to be at least 300 to 400 pounds, and not a single alternate stone could be seen in its procession. Whoever engineered this lining had a puritanical streak, a stubborn need for crafted consistency, which is artistic step up from the craftwork of the designers below, literally and figuratively. In the elevated milky mist, with the burning red Maple leaves looming just at the edge of the hill, it looked otherworldly, like a train track running from hell to heaven. This is an undeniable trend in so many old-growth areas; impressive stone statements placed specifically at the higher elevations of forests. This is exactly what Natives called the “place of power” in their stories. One thing that is obvious about this scene is that on sunnier days the area will obviously absorb unobstructed light for a maximum amount of time, along the with the stone-linings running over them. This set up may very well serve to channel that collected energy from the Sun out into the forest beyond, into the other stone-linings, and the valley below. I have seen a set up just like this at Cavan Burren National Park in Northern Ireland, where the landscape is interconnected by Megaliths, and of course blatantly misunderstood by local “scientists”.

Coming down from this knoll Lincoln Pond Trail continues northwest, where fields and clearing are lined again with stones at the edge various and beautiful glades. These are perfect spots to sit down and appreciate everything you might have seen. The trail extends for several more miles before an optional loop back to the southern entrance, or an exit to the north. It is important to note that in several other locations in the woods, while exploring this area, there were amazing and mysterious things to see. I came upon a huge lining of stones with a symmetrical tint not far from the southern boarder. It was impressive, with the larger stones towards the top, which is another strange trend to be found in old-growth stoneworks in New England. Any mason putting the larger stones towards the top is making a bold statement, as if to say, “I can do whatever I want, despite the difficulty of crafting the structure this way.”  This lining below is not far from the entrance of the trail, roughly 40 yard off to the right of the path. There may very well be something buried beneath this incredible mound.  There was a great deal of effort and time put into stacking and leveling these 100 to 500 pound stones, the higher the heavier, which indicates the unique and unlimited mindset of whoever built it.

And finally, not far from this ‘lining’, is what I believe to be the remnants of a New England Dolmen, now in a dilapidated state. This rounded boulder was clearly supported and elevated by other stones beneath. It is now only partially supported, which has happened to several Celtic alters abroad. Whatever the truth is about this area, it is obviously an enchanted cultural center that the forest has grown over, and in a beautiful way. It’s time for anthropologists to get their heads around the idea that the stones were probably here first, and the forest, like a grafted grid, grew up around the Megaliths.

Ashburnham State Forest is the epitome of the enchanted New England hike. These woods are in a wonderful state of ‘spooky respiration’, augmented by a universe of color and decor along the trail. This place supports every magical fairytale that has ever been told, but more importantly, it supports a very real Megalithic cultural scene that increasingly emerges with each and every hike taken through these woods. Celtic places have a very similar feel, an it just becomes impossible to ignore the Megalithic foundation of these old-growth regions in New England. If you want to see something sacred, simply find your way to Ashbunrham State Forest; it won’t take long, but be sure to take your time.

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February 05, 2017

Rattlesnake Mountain

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Location: Erving, Massachusetts

Elevation: 1,067 ft

Note:  Running along the northern border of Massachusetts is a unique set of rolling “small-mountain” ranges. These elevations are too tall to be called mere hills, but too small to be known as full-fledged mountains. Rattlesnake Mountain sits in the heart of this range in the northwestern portion of the state, surrounded by similar small-mountain peaks in Monroe and Savoy to the west, with Watatic to the east. The woodsy entrance for the car park leading to the main trail at Rattlesnake Mountain is nearly hidden, just off Rt 2A, about 100 yards from Maple Ave, in the picturesque country-town of Erving.

The trail at Rattlesnake’ is essentially a 2.4 mile loop that broadly encircles a massive metamorphic rock ledge. Known as The Farley Ledges, this precipice is enveloped by trees, standing about 220 feet high, and about a mile-and-a-half wide, east to west (image below)…  Rock climbers scale this ledge in a world all their own, paying very little attention to the boulders and stones that line the ground below. If they did pay attention, a closer look at these stones reveal something pretty amazing. Here at Rattlesnake’ there is a megalithic mystery that reaches deep into the heart of Massachusetts forests and mountains, a mystery that most often goes unspoken. Simply put, there are hundreds of gigantic cut stones which are measured and marked inundating the forest floor just beneath the ridge. There are pathways that run directly into this “stone playground” where various crafted stones sit (image below)…Other megaliths are fixed in some pretty curious positions in arrangements near the trail, winding like a display along the ledge (image below)…Some of the stones look to be placed in specific places, while others look to have been tossed about like giant toy blocks. The incrementation markings on the huge stones are not in inches or centimeters, they are some other form of measurement entirely.  The image above is of two rather long rectangular pieces thrown into a pile at Rattlesnake’. Pieces exactly like this exist at the pass of Mount Bearnagh in Ireland (image below)… They also exist at Lynn Woods Reserve in Lynn Massachusetts (image below)…which is 40 miles east of here. Look at the  incrementation on the stone in Lynn Woods; between the long marks are 9 short marks. What system of measurement uses increments of 9? And there are countless other places throughout New England where this specific type of rectangular piece can be found. As documented proof of these megalithic stones is slowly compiled, it becomes clear that our modern culture is built directly over what was once a megalithic culture. In old-growth forests and mountain ridges where houses have never been built the evidence for this culture still remains. And please remember, these stones are several tons each, if not more. Whoever cut and placed them, had the ability to do so, and without strain.  Other stones beneath the ridge are smaller square pieces (image below)…

And more stones can be found here, some covered by countless seasons, or are partially entrenched in the earth. It becomes clear that someone literally went to work in this area, and was utilizing megalithic size stones the way a carpenter uses wood blocks (images below)…

 

      

      

 

 

 

 

As you head east along the initial trail, passing by these monoliths and huge fixtures, there are other stones that emerge which are relevant to the patterns of megaliths in New England. The equilateral triangle has showed its face in stone in almost every deep woods hiking trail and reserve from northern Maine to western Massachusetts. Here, somehow fixed into a boulder, was a perfect equilateral triangle (image below)…  It is at the center of this massive fixture, with a cubicly cut stone to its left, and another perfect equilateral to its right. All of this is under a rock precipice serving as a roof which looks to weigh about 100 tons. The overall symmetrical setting is above (image above), with the central equilateral in the middle, sitting on a perfectly leveled shelf of stone. Please understand, this stone is part of the boulder beneath it; it was carved out to protrude specifically in this fashion. I could not move it. Here’s a closer look (image below)Just a few feet up the trail is another fixture with a equilateral triangle that is guarded by several massive stones. This stone is not only an equilateral, but is a three sided prism that is connected to the boulder beneath it. (image below)In the woods of Upton Massachusetts there are granite cut equilateral prisms attached to the boulders beneath them (image below), extremely similar to these stones found at Rattlesnake’. I believe the Triangle is the megalithic “calling card” of the ancient culture that once dwelt in the hills of New England, just as the Spiral was the calling card of the megalithic culture that once dwelt once dwelt in Ireland. If you recognize this, then you will realize that New England, in its own way, is a landscape that is just as mythical and beautiful as those traditionally endeared in England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales. When you hike through these small mountains, you’re hiking through zones of ancient mysteries yet to be solved, but can be seen right before your eyes. The trees of woods are spaced amicably, with small groves of baby pines and birches emerging in various areas. Enjoy these beautiful groves (image below )…   With all of this existing right infornt of you, it can be hard to get back to the natural beauty of the trail ahead, which is another wonderful aspect to hiking the forests of New England and Rattlesnake Mountain. As you step away from these mysterious alters beneath the grand ledge, continue east.  After about 1/4 mile you will come to a stream rolling down the mountain from above (image below). Turn to follow this stream upward, as you are now on the eastern extremity of the trail (image below).

This waterway is so similar to Celtic scenes that you might find at Tollymore Forest in Ireland, or Killarney National Park. The rocks are strewn over the flowing water, with glowing moss beyond. Following the waterways clears the senses and improves your “sound palate” with the soft trickling and smooth rolling of water over stone. This consistency of sound eliminates the sensory overload we experience in our daily lives, which have become controlled blasts of commercial intrusions. One walk along these streams can clear your head for days. Continue up the incline which follows the stream until the trail crosses over the water, to left, at the top of the hillside. The trail continues into an elevated old-growth forest with a classic New England blend of Oak, Maple, Pine, Beech, and Birch trees. Looking northward this forest continues all the way into Vermont.(image below)Continuing west on the elevated trail there are minature ledges with tiny pillars creating a tiny cavern on the underside of the precipice (image below)…At Cavan Burren National Park in Ireland, where there are some of the most astounding Celtic megalithic monuments in the world, there are also notable stone ledges with the small pillars creating a cavern beneath the tiny granite ridge (image below)… After passing these curious small pillars the trail continues west for about a mile, where other large flat cliffs emerge to the north. These gigantic shelves are layered in loose parallel shafts for 50 to 100 yards each, at about 45 feet in height. (image below)

In some places there are small standing stones at the edges of these small cliffs (below)…

A similar stone in the historically megalithic town of Upton stands, just like this stone in Rattlesnake’, along a large stone-lining near the ancient Upton Chamber (below)…

Keep in mind that these are not “small” stones, they are cut and crafted granite pieces that go as far into the ground as they are above; and they are perfectly squared. They are clearly a cultural marker of some kind created in antiquity. You will continue to follow the trail west until it turns left again, towards the western edge of the Farley Ledges, where the best lookout of the trail is found after about another 1/4 mile. The woods on this western edge of the trail are massive shelves and boulders overgrown with classic New England Fauna (image below)…At the western extreme of the trail, over looking Route 2A, is the southerly view of the heart of Massachusetts (image below)… 

After taking in this view, the last portion of the loop descends back along Farley Ledge to the east. There are miniature canyons below, and gigantic granite walls slicing through the hills (image below)…You will eventually come to a lower crossing of the stream at the eastern edge of the trail, then head back down to the megaliths below at Farley Ledge.

Rattlesnake Mountain is yet another example of classic New England hiking that combines practically magical megalithic statements in the forest and mountains with a pristine hiking experience. Time after time, forests and mountains of Celtic and New England places reveal a related megalithic mystery yet to be acknowledged by so many academics. Rattlesnake is clearly one of these sacred places, and it will grant the hiker a vision of something miraculous, something which is calling out to us from a culture that left its mark in a way that will never fade. You can touch these signature stones yourself, see the size and scope of them, walk the trails, and simply wander right into the hallowed wonder of it all.   

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January 11, 2017

Baxter State Park

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Location: Millinocket Maine/USA

Trail: Hurd’s Pond Trail

Note: Baxter State Park is over 200,000 square acres of protected wilderness, rolling 18 miles northwest of the welcoming country-town of Millinocket, Maine. The crowning feature of this incredible old-growth preserve is Mount Katahdin, a 5,267 foot peak, and final mountain along the American northeast’s 1,500 mile Appalachian Trail. The Piscataquis and Penobscot Rivers cut through the southeasterly portion of the park, creating opportunities for riding rapids and hiking along waterfalls, all with Mount Katahdin looming stoically in the background. Dozens of trails are spread throughout the park. “Hunt Trail” is the official Appalachian pathway to the alpine peak of Katahdin. Other trails that run to the peak, such as “Knives Edge”, “Abol”, “Cathedral”, and several others, require a reservation with the park before arrival, which can be made easily on-line at: http://www.baxterstateparkauthority.com/reservation/ The trails here also offer a good deal of anthropological mystery, with megalithic stones in patterns and shapes that push the envelope of our imaginations. I hope people understand that this is a site about fully appreciating what is discovered on wildlife pathways, and it is not meant to be shocking or offensive in any way. The information and evidence in the forests of New England support a megalithic culture that had specific memes and themes cut into granite, all for the world to discover. These mysterious stones can be found on Hurd’s Pond Trail, and I hope people visit these woods and judge for themselves what is being described here. Trails which are not at an immediate proximity to Katahdin will NOT require a reservation, such as trails that run along the rivers, old-growth forests, lakes, rocky ledges, and icy caves, several miles to the south.

Hurd’s Pond Trail: “Hurd’s Pond Trail” will take you through some pretty cool natural features, and picturesque pathways, with several points along the way that give wonderful pause, and appreciation. The Abol-Bridge Campground site is the jumping-off point for this trail, which runs the east-to-west course of the main road of the Reserve, Golden Road. The Northeast Piscataquis River runs south from Abol Bridge, with a dirt road running along its edge, eventually veering southwest into the forest trail. You can choose to walk the 3.5 miles along this stretch of scenic river-road to arrive at the car park of “Hurd’s Pond Trail”, or you can simply drive to the car park, which will be on your right after the 3.5 miles.

Hurd’s Pond Trail is a relatively short hike on it’s own, of about 2.5 miles culminating at the “Ice Caves”, an enticing network of boulders and passages overlooking Debsconeag Lake to the south. Before you get there you pass a set of pathways that feature different types of ledges, hedges, glades, and anthropologically mysterious megaliths. The lower trail runs over thousands of roots, and passes around grand fixtures of boulders that look to have been placed specifically along this particular part of the forest. Take a look at this boulder pictured below; do you notice anything particular about it? To answer the question: there are half-a-dozen massive triangular boulders, cut with a flat face and rounded back, standing at about 10 feet in height, and perhaps 20 tons in weight, along the path to the Ice Caves. It’s astonishing.  There is first one triangular boulder to the right, and then one triangular boulder to the left, and then another to the right again, all within the first half mile of the hike. It is hard for me to believe that seasoned hikers and naturalists simply pass by this without taking any note of it whatsoever? Personally, it is impossible for me not to stop and wonder what this might indicate. Take a look at the image below; how could you ignore this? These are teams of similarly crafted boulders, staring you right in the face. Not only are they similarly crafted, but they are facing the exact same direction, north, which is staring directly at Mount Katahdin. If it were not for the amount of clearly crafted triangular stones that I have time-and-time-again found in various forests of New England, I would have a hard time writing this portion of the blog. I completely understand that some people may be entirely skeptical of this, but at this point it is utterly obvious to me that the equilateral triangle was worshiped by a megalithic culture in the forests of New England. To support this, just take a look at some of the examples of granite-cut triangles discovered from places all over New England, found in hard to reach places like significant mountain elevations,  waterfall facades, and deep woods ridges, miles from modernity in every direction. Please consider, that scientifically speaking, Equilateral Triangles DO NOT OCCUR IN NATURE. These shapes were obviously crafted. Something is going on with the Triangle in antiquity, and anthropologists are simply choosing to totally, and absolutely, ignore it.

         

 

 

 

 

There is more to add to the mysterious elements at Hurd’s Pond Trail. Once you pass the initial triangular megaliths, you will come to groupings of boulders deeper into the woods that have other compelling features. You will first drift through some heavy hedges and narrow lanes, and come out to a beautiful glade of 100 foot tall Pines. The boulders under these pines have specifically fitted cuts, within the rock faces themselves, which are angled and overlapped to create a triangular feature. In the image below, these two boulders are not sitting at random; the left boulder has a level right-face that is meshed in a perfectly flush fit to the cut-and-leveled left side of the  boulder on the right. If you look closely it is absolutely clear. This ‘flush overlapping’ of the stone creates a specifically triangular space beneath.   Take a look at some more examples from New England forests where I’ve found flush-fitted overlapping boulders that create triangular spaces. It’s not simply the triangular space beneath the rock, but it is the exact precision of the continued lines  which create these angles that amazes me. How this is possible is hard to comprehend, and yet it is there.

 

As you continue into the last half mile of Hurd’s Pond Trail you will see granite boulders with rounded-out arches, and the fitted pieces that resulted, sitting within a few small feet of each expression. Look at this section that was cut from this huge boulder below; the piece that was cut is sitting just to the right, like a block waiting to be inserted. It should also be noted that the top of these particular boulders have been cut flat, like a square. This is obviously some type of expression; like some megalithic craftsman saying “Look what I can do!”

After passing a few hillsides with beautiful trees you will come to the sign that points to the Ice Caves, which do not have ice in late July. There is a railing and ladder that you can climb down into the caves, with its shafts of shadow, wind, and light. Above the Ice Cave boulders is a view of the beautiful Debsconeag Lake to the south. At this point you will have completed one of the better introductory trails to a worthy wildlife preserve in Baxter State Park. Work your way back steadily to the car park, and make sure you give yourself enough time to return before the Sun goes down.  

Final Note: New England is home to one of the most mysterious megalithic cultures in the world, which is obviously supported here at Stonestrider.com. This culture is very similar to the Celtic megalithic culture, which of course also has its own beautiful massive stone statements from the earliest era in History.  Supported by consistent evidence, the megaliths of New England obviously have their own specific memes; rather than Celtic “spirals”, New England offers us ‘triangles’ cut out of, and into, the stones. I hope people come to understand the anthropological significance of this statement, and that every culture in the world seems to support a megalithic era, with distinct evidence. Baxter State Park is one of these sacred places, with natural beauty in the landscape, epic grandeur in the mountains, and mysterious megalithic statements deep within the forests. It is everything that this website hopes to bring to the foray. Do not to take my word for it,  but seek and find these sacred places for yourself.

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December 28, 2016

Mount Chocorua

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Location: Albany, New Hampshire/USA

Elevation: 3,478ft

Note: At the southern edge of The White Mountain National Forest of New Hampshire, sits the rocky, Pine-covered-peak of Mount Chocorua. The White Mountains are part of the grand Appalachian Trail, which runs 1500 miles south, all the way to Mount Springer in Georgia. About 50 miles directly north of Chocorua is the largest and most famous of the White Mountains, Mount Washington, standing at 6,289 ft. In the 50 miles between Chocorua and Washington are nearly a dozen seemingly animated peaks, all of which can be seen from a stellar vista at the top of Mount Chocorua, some 3,478 ft high.

Trail: Starting out, take Rt 16 to Moulton Drive in New Hampshire, which is a short length dirt road located behind an old antique store. Moulton Drive takes you to the Car Park for ‘Piper Trail’, the best approach at Chocorua Mountain.  Start as early as you can, and bring plenty of water, New Hampshire in the Summer can be hot and humid. It is about 3.5 miles to the peak, so be ready for a solid seven mile hike, including a challenging rocky incline to get above the treeline.

At the beginning of Piper Trail you are enveloped by  tall White-Pines, rusty colored Red Spruces, Ash, and Balsam trees. Further up the trail, bright Birch groves appear like miniature pillars protesting the hazy green shimmering of millions of leaves. After about a mile, you will cross the Chocorua River, and begin the slight elevation. This slight incline runs along a pristine forest ledge which carries a cool breeze through the shade.  As you continue you will come across free-sitting-boulders beside the trail, which are mingled with the vast hedges running straight up the mountain. These glades continue northeast and west, rolling for 60 protected miles that contains Black Bears, Caribou, and White Tail Deer. Like so many of the trails in New England, rocky staircases which are cut out of the mountain will begin to appear. At the base of many of these carved stairs there are triangular stones often marking the trail. It is a phenomenon that is found all throughout New England.

Here are three 8 foot tall equilateral-triangle megaliths at Five Ponds Loop Trail in Baxter State Forest in Maine, in the shadow of Mount Katahdin. It’s as if the overgrowth on the stones knows its not supposed to grow on these flat cut surfaces. The front side of these stones are absolutely smooth, with a face cut like a knife through cake, while the back sides are arched and rounded. A profile view of the triangle stones is in the far left image. See how the hedge inundates the back, but the face is not touched? And these three stones are identical, lining the pathway like signs on a highway. The chances of this are gastronomical. If I had not hiked almost every trail in Massachusetts and seen the triangular phenomenon for myself, I would have a hard time believing it, but time and time again it shows up, and is becoming impossible to deny. This “cut-face” style is very much like certain types of Celtic standing stones in Glenveagh National Park in Ireland, and Watatic Mountain in Massachusetts, which have stones with smoothly cut faces, supported by large rounded rears. Here is a look at one of the diamond shape “cut-face” stones at Glenveagh, with a profile view, and the frontal view (white stone below). I believe these are anthropological stones, cultural statements, not random.  The meaning of the triangle requires more


 

 

 

 

 

explanation, and will be explored in a separate post. Continuing on at Mount Chocorua, the small triangle will mark your first stone staircase. As you begin to climb, Chipmunks and Squirrels scatter in every direction, storing acorns under the warm stones.

Ascending this stair you will begin to come across ‘signature cross sections’, or ‘X’s’, that also appear mysteriously at trails throughout New England. Here is a cross section along the trail at Chocorua on the left, and a cross section at Mount Watatic on the right.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Further up “Piper Trail”, (as if this isn’t strange enough) is another ‘cross section’, but one-quarter portion of its total figure has been cut out, and moved several feet down the trail, like a giant puzzle piece. This is clearly a stylized craftsmanship, like fitted blocks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The stairway has many “signature” type stones, indicating that someone is leaving a stylized mark on this pathway. After several stairways you will come to the large boulder-porches that begin to break the treeline.The mid-portion of this hike is a trek on boulder-porches and tight pathways. The view becomes beautiful, looking south into Massachusetts and the river-valley below. The ever rolling aspect of these mountains is more clearly revealed, with a slightly blue hue on the peaks that mingle with the sky in the peripheral distance.   Turning your attention towards the peak, you will reach a ‘crossroad’ of choices in a glade just before the final ascent. There is a wooden sign that points to the pathway leading north, further into the forest, and an arrow pointing left, to the peak. As you follow the Peak Trail sign you will arrive at a stunning boulder-ledge that mingles with White Pines,  running roughly 150 steep yards, straight to the peak. There is a singular massive boulder that is set in place in a distinctly different way from the others, with several incised lines around its sides sitting just before the final ledge. This may very well be a type of Dolmen. Continuing beyond this mysterious stone you will arrive at the top. Take your time here, and enjoy the cool crosswind along with a spectacular view. White Mountain National Forest is unveiled.The peak of Chocorua is a 360 degree porch, and it is also a dragonfly haven! There is a standard official mountain-marker at the highest point if you wish to touch it, as many hikers do to complete their hike. The clouds roll cumulus into the states beyond, and the sun is warm on the boulders of the peak at Mount Chocorua. Climbing this mountain is absolutely a significant accomplishment. I have found many Celtic mountains to be less challenging than this White Mountain gem. New Hampshire is a wonderful place, with a vast natural habitat well worth exploring. It is comparable to places like The Mourn Mountain Range in Ireland, and The Glenveagh Mountains in north Ireland.  If you give the White Mountains a chance you could very well fall in love with the classic New Hampshire countryside. Find your way, and go strong.

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December 12, 2016

Heath Altar Stones

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alter-fileminimizerLocation: Town of Heath, Massachusetts/USA

Note:  The Heath Altar is one of the best kept Celtic secrets I’ve seen to date, and it’s in Western Massachusetts, of all places. Unfortunately it is on a private residential farmstead that is not in any way welcoming, which is disappointing because every megalithic  site in Ireland is on a private farmstead, but Irish farmers almost never restrict hikers intent on finding sacred sites located in their fields. Sadly, the signs on the road approaching the Heath Altar vista read: “Trespassers will be arrested, or shot.” Flatly, this is an unfortunate indicator about American attitudes these days. I was extremely frustrated to finally arrive at this beautiful area in Heath, only to find ‘KEEP OUT’ signs, but I did not allow this to stop me from getting to the Altar. It is extremely rare that I would write about, or encourage hiking in a place that you could get arrested or harmed, but it is important to me that people see this incredible Altar from it’s intended intimacy. It was worth risk for the images achieved. I humbly believe that these are the best pictures ever released of this gorgeous sacred site. This particular area of central/northern Massachusetts, on the boarder of Vermont, is one of the fairest countrysides one could hope to discover, especially in the season of peak Autumn, which is when I went. Now people have a chance to see, up close, for most likely the first time, a full Celtic altar, but in New England.    alter-view-fileminimizerThe Town of Heath:    The rustic countryside on the boarder of Vermont and central Massachusetts, on the northeastern coast of the U.S, is as picturesque as any Celtic scene. Small mountains, rocky hills, Pines, Birches, and Hemlocks, all dot the landscape. The four classic seasons flux distinctly in this part of the world, with a most captivating Autumn.misty-hill-fileminimizer The Green Mountains of Vermont are 15 miles northwest of Heath, along with state preserved trails at Mount Watatic, Monument Mountain, Savoy Falls, and Bears Den, all within an hour of here (and featured on this site). These woods have inspired tales and fables from the ancient tribes like the Mohegan and Wampanog, who inhabited this region while the Celts and Picti inhabited Ireland, England, and Scotland. One of the most amazing commonalities between New England and Celtic places are the hilltop alters such as the haunting Heath Altar Stones.dscf3160-fileminimizer Along the streams approaching the area in Heath are Celtic looking irrigation walls that provide ‘pivots’ in the landscape for the stream to flow by. This 12 foot high, and beautifully leveled, work of irrigation is only 4 miles from the Heath Altar, adding to the mystique of the overall area.dscf3059-fileminimizerThe dry rocky plateau on which this Altar sits radiates hallowed vibrations. These are among the oldest cultural structures on earth. There is a loose symmetry to the scene, with a bed of flat granite at the highest point of the broad hill, guarded at each of it’s four corners by deeply incised, and notched, standing stones. The standing stones here are not flimsy, as depicted in most old articles. These are broad and intimidating megaliths, which can be seen here against the scale of a lovely human being amidst the fixtures.dscf3111-fileminimizer This is the photographic justice this site demands, capturing the grandeur of the overall area as well, not obscure images from old newspaper articles or desperately zoomed photos from 100 yards away from fearful on-lookers. Everything about this place says “Celtic Altar”, not “colonial farmer’s pet project”, which is what many writers have guessed is the meaning of these stones. Irish farmers did not claim the Irish altars. They would think it disrespectful and inviting a curse to even imply such a thing. Yet in the United States, the idea of colonials having possibly built these megaliths is often mentioned. It is infuriating, and totally irresponsible. Nothing about this area says ‘colonial’.dscf3102-fileminimizer The standing stones are each about 6 feet in height, and a single foot in width. Just beyond the Altar is a fifth standing stone that serves as a kind of head-stone. The ‘stone table’ may have served to support a bonfire, or perhaps it was more of a literal ‘large table’, used for sacrificial rites, or skinning hunted game. Whatever happened at this spot, the builders of this place made it distinct, so it is clear that this was considered a sacred place.beautiful1-1024x275Radiating out away from the Altar are smaller standing stones.

Smaller Standing Stones near by: Here is look at a smaller white marble, 3 feet tall standing stone, almost 50 yards from the top of the hill. Stones like this may have served as a boundary, or warning stone, for others approaching the Alter. It is obvious that this particular stone was also chosen for its beauty.white-stander-1-fileminimizer In another area away from the Altar site, possibly fixed to the northerly cardinal direction, sits another standing stone deeply set into the ground, and somewhat tilted. This one looks to have been about 8 feet long, although only about 3 feet is above ground, with a darker colored rock face pointing to Vermont just beyond.panoram-second-stone-heath-three-fileminimizerFacing to the south is another amazing standing stone that has a 45 degree angular cut at the ‘arrowhead top’, standing roughly three feet high, and six inches thick. This particular type of stone can be found in other parts of New England as well, supporting the idea that it is a singular megalithic culture that occupied this natural space. Pictured on the right is a massive 45 degree angle New England standing stone with the same dimensions as the Heath standing stone below. The area the Heath stone is directing our attention towards is fantastic. Type A (1) The trees here are stunning at this time of year. Notice also that even the flat granite stones along the ground seem to have been leveled and cut on their sides. The amount of cultural stonework happening here gives the area a type of energy, perhaps like at the Hill of Tara in Ireland, or at the Avebury stone circle. The feeling is just overwhelming that someone, a very long time ago, loved this place enough to mark it out in amazingly playful ways with massive stones.dscf3076-1-fileminimizerQuartz stones and classic Celtic stone-linings:  The energy-storing and transferring properties of quartz are well known. On this rocky plateau sits one of the most abundant quartz rock faces in all New England. The surreal vision it creates against the dry red brush is striking, looking almost like snow. dscf3066-fileminimizer Quartz boulders are scattered throughout the area. It would make sense that if this place was designed as a kind of ‘energy center’,with the quartz absorbing energy from the Sun. This piece below looks to weigh at least half a ton, set proudly above a cut granite slab. dscf3065-fileminimizer It’s as if megalithic anthropological sites are revealing a knowledge of the properties of stones. If this is true, then this entire area is a type of energy center. Further to the north are classic Celtic linings running through the area. These can be found in Cavan Burren National Park in a very similar style, connecting peaks from hill top to hill top. There are enough of these linings in New England to circle the earth six times, with probably just as many in Ireland and England. dscf3125-fileminimizerNew England, somehow, is absolutely Celtic: There are beautiful subtleties to understand about this place. The elevation of the rocky hill; the distance to the tree’s below to the altar in the high clearing; and the fauna of the tall reeds mingling with the stones looking exactly like hilltops in the heart of Ireland. Take a look at the overall similarity between this hill in Heath, and the hill top above Kinnitty Forest in Ireland, where stone-linings and irrigation walls exist in the landscape as well. It’s as if the landscapes are paternal twins, with similar scaling in the features, with only different colors to distinguish them. The elevations and patterns of sacred Neolithic places are similar because it was a similar culture that was choosing them, valuing the exact same things.dscf3115-fileminimizerHere is the hilltop at Heath.x4Here is the hilltop at Kinnitty  

Summary: Look at all these features at Heath. It’s overwhelming, and obviously a cultural center. Once upon a time these advantageous vistas were chosen by a Celtic culture, both in Ireland and New England. They were absolutely of the same mind, as to what areas were worth inhabiting. The similarity of these chosen areas, the elevations and circumference of the rocky clearings, the distance to running streams, the types of stone being utilized, the megaliths themselves, all reveal compelling evidence towards a related culture, both in the American northeast and the ancient Irish hills. The Heath Altar Stones are a direct anthropological connection to the Celtic world, and yet this information is considered ‘alternative‘. It’s absurd when seen first hand, what the academics are ignoring. There is an energy and beauty in central Massachusetts that is on-par with any of the preserved pastoral natural spaces of the Celtic world. All it takes is an exploratory hike in the forests and rocky hills of Heath, and you will see and feel it for yourself.  And that is the more important point, to see it, and feel it for yourself. Don’t let anyone tell you what something is before analyzing it for yourself, or it won’t be long before not one of your ideas will actually be your own. When you find a sacred place, it reveals the sacred potential in you. Go for it.dscf3063-1-fileminimizer

 

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November 14, 2016

The Blue Hills Wildlife Preserve

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widescreen-possible-fileminimizerLocation Milton, Massachusetts

Note: The Blue Hills is a quintessential New England hiking area, with the perfect combination of rocky pathways, quiet groves, elevated vistas, and mysterious stones. Trails include the Walcott Loop, the Skyline Trail, Rattlesnake Trail, Great Blue Hill, and dozens of minor trails to be discovered. Great Blue Hill is the highest elevation here at 695 feet. There is over 6000 acres to explore, with the option to mountain-bike, which thousands of people enjoy during the Spring season. There is preserved old-growth forest, inclusive of 100 foot Pines, small Birch groves, Hemlocks, and Oaks. Some of the trails are wide pathways lined with small cut stones, while others are staircases cut right out of the hills.blue-hills-magic-fileminimizer Blue Hills was a sacred place for the Native Americans for thousands of years before the Europeans arrived. We can certainly see why. The Colonials that arrived in the “New World” were fleeing what they considered to be a completely bought-out scene in England, Scotland, and Ireland. Lords and Men-of-property owned, and taxed, all the land, from the Medieval period into the Colonial. The 17th century in Europe was actually a “late’ period in terms of land ownership. Everything was owned.  There was nothing left. Christian Puritans found the state of affairs in London, and elsewhere, intolerable. They decided to take their chances on getting their own land across the Atlantic Ocean. When these mostly poor pilgrims, explorers, trappers, and farmers arrived, and began to explore the forests and hills of this wilderness, what they found, in places like Blue Hills, would absolutely astonish them. beauvista-1-fileminimizer Secret History:  The image above is a look at the countryside southwest of the beautiful city of Boston in April 2016. It was in this exact season in 1775 that King George of England issued a mandate to General Thomas Gage for the disarmament of the resistant colonials living in this beautiful region. It was yet another attempt to expand England, and possess these abundantly fertile hills. I have to believe, looking at this picture, that the colonials felt this was a place, if ever there was one, that was absolutely worth fighting for. There is something even deeper about the landscape that colonial farmers must have noticed in their appreciation of the terrain.dsc04170-fileminimizer Colonial frontiersmen would have looked for advantageous areas to live, strategically smart elevations close to running streams, with crop potential and forestry for building. Celtic homesteads had been established for almost 1400 years already under the Medieval system back in Ireland and Scotland. Lords possessed the lands with Titles, the best of which long maintained crops, and were often inclusive of megalithic stonewalls that followed riversides to Cairns and Dolmens built in the Celtic era. Men-of-property certainly made the connection that Cairns and Dolmens were a sign of ideal land, almost always placed near resources and advantageous elevations. So it must have seemed miraculous to Colonial frontiersmen when they wandered into the forests and mountains of the “New World” only to discover megalithic stone ‘walls’ already running along the riversides, leading to the most advantageous plots, near streams, peaks, and good soil. Imagine their amazement when they found stone Cairns in these lush areas, with corbel craftsmanship, identical to that of Celtic Cairns in Ireland and England.  Native Americans did not claim the stonework. Natives were seasonally nomadic, and were in no way inclined to build stone cities. This is not dismissive of Native American anthropological development. Wooden ‘villages’ expanded into the hundreds of thousands in population in many areas, and were highly sophisticated, but they simply did not work with megalithic stones.

The Unspoken Thing:  The unspoken thing about New England, the secret that has gone to the graves of almost every Native American tribe and Colonial woodsmen, is that America was once occupied by a megalithic culture, just like Ireland and England. Imagine if you were a Colonial farmer and you discovered this secret, that the soil and stonework of the ‘New World’ was of the same mystical sanctity of the lands Lords and Title holders had been possessing in domineering fashion throughout European history. Not only was the land giving you the essential signs of quality you were hoping for, but it went a step further, and somehow was revealing Celtic features that you could not in your wildest dreams have imagined existed in this part of the world. It was so completely familiar, but in an entirely new place. They absolutely would’ve taken this as a sign from God, and therefor fought with everything they had to keep it. I truly believe that this was a significant part of the reason why Colonial militiamen met the British on the field of Battle on July 4th of 1776. Colonial farmers must have had in-depth conversations about what they were finding in the woods, Celtic style stone-works that British Lords coveted and valued on their estates for centuries. It would’ve been the ultimate incentive to fight. The Blue Hills Reservation is one of the most beloved remaining testaments to these wonders of the old growth forests, filled with Celtic stonework running along streams, small mountains, and rocky elevations.  They are still there today, as the builders obviously intended.

Connections to Ireland: The image below is a stone staircase at one of the main trails at Blue Hills. Notice how this first step is positioned, displaying the markings like an invitation, shown on the top frontal face, rather than tucking it out of sight as masons are trained to do. Whoever built this staircase wanted us to notice the craftsmanship. Everything about it says “notice me”.  ancient-stairway-cut-stone-fileminimizer The style of incremented cuts on this blue granite stone is in the exact same style as cuts made to white granite on high elevation staircases at Mount Bearnagh, in the beautiful Mourn Mountain Range of northeast Ireland. Here is a look at one of those stones below, quarried in the heights by stone stairs leading up the mountain, but was never placed in the ground for some reason. The styles are identicalbearnagh-ancient-cut-stone-fileminimizer. And just like at Blue Hills, Mount Bearnagh is inundated with other stones all around, that have incremented markings, smoothed surfaces, and right angles.

Features of Blue Hills: Take a look at this amazing granite standing-stone that rests in a beautiful old growth Pine-glade at Blue Hills. It looks like something out of Game of Thrones. It stands at about 7 feet high, and 3 feet in width. There is no other stone comparable to it within the vicinity.dsc03658-fileminimizer There are angles specifically cut into its sides. It has clearly been worked on. Not only are the angles obvious, but the stones that were cut away are placed all around the area. It looks to be some kind of expression.  There are hundreds of thousands of granite pieces that have been worked on all throughout the forests here. Of course, the next question from that statement will be: “What could they do with such a massive amount of cut stones if this happened all over the forests?”

More Irish Connections/Stone-linings: The answer to the question is literally all around the woods: the Stone-linings. What modern anthropologists have mistakingly (and lazily) called “walls”, are more accurately understood to be ‘Stone-linings’ that run, like connecting cables, from peak to peak, and even zig-zag up entire hillsides in some areas. Who builds stone walls that zig zag up a mountain? No one. This Stone-lining phenomenon is also found at Mount Bearnagh in Ireland. Here is a spot in Ireland that illustrates my point clearly; Please take a look at this image of two separate stone projects at the Pass in the heights of Mount Bearnagh; It clearly distinguishes the two structures as absolutely different.celtic-era-wall-against-modern-fileminimizer

The stones on the far right of this image are clearly crafted as a wall, meant to contain flocks and cattle from drifting into the next valley. It was built by Irish masons in the 17th, or late 18th century.  Notice how the stones of this wall are not aligned with the direct center of the mountain beyond, but is right-of-center of the peak, simply stopping once it reaches the cliff side. Since domesticated Cows and Sheep don’t climb vertical cliffs, the purpose of the structure is obviously complete, as a wall. The project on the left in the image, however, is a Stone-lining. It obviously cannot stop the movement of anything. I believe this ‘Lining’ was built by the very first culture in Ireland. As you can see, the stones specifically align towards the center of the mountain beyond, and actually continues up the mountain in massive stacked shelves (if you look close), all the way to the center. What this image doesn’t show us is that in the other direction, the Lining continues towards the center of the opposite peak in the same way. It is evident that this megalithic period structure was intended to connect the peaks, like cables connecting power sources. I have found this same phenomenon at Glenveagh National Park, Ireland, Mount Chocorua New Hampshire, and Mount Monadnock, New Hampshire, as well as dozens of other places. (Noted here on Stonetstrider.com.) One more important thing to consider is that the Irish did not take stones from the Linings to build the wall; Why not? It’s right there, why not use it? The answer is, the Lining is ancient, and sacred, and the Irish know it. They would not touch it. If we now understand that Linings are sacred, and the Blue Hills is literally covered in massive megalithic Linings, that makes the entire Blue Hills Reserve sacred.

Stone-linings (Linings) at Blue Hills: The Blue Hills is a Stone-lining universe. Colonials would’ve seen these stones and been absolutely stunned. Some of them connect the peaks, others zig-zag up the hills as i mentioned before, and some “crown” the massive stone ledges around the peaks, like at Mount Watatic, Massachusetts, (also featured here on Stonestrider.com.) The image below is an example of a fine Lining found on one of the elevated porches at Blue Hills.

dsc04115-fileminimizer The next Lining is much more substantial, and running straight up the side of one of the small mountains at Blue Hills.  There are literally hundreds of these Linings, requiring more work and tools than any team of New England craftsman could ever in ten lifetimes  complete. And where are the tools that quarried and crafted these stones? No signs of them, anywhere.

dsc03796-fileminimizerHere is a dizzying look at several Linings zig-zagging up the mountain side just off one of the trails at Blue Hills. I believe that the stones were part of this scene long before the trees were there. At one time, this hillside looked a lot more like Celtic hills, unobstructed visually. It is harder to see megalithic patterns in New England with countless layers of leaves and trees, but there is some kind of pattern here. Its almost as if the entire hillside is a megalithic statement. The picture below is a hill about 100 yards high, with Linings of 100 to 1000 pound stones everywhere. Unreal. A glacier ripping this hillside would’ve discombobulated any pattern in the stones, not stacked them into Linings that looked to modern eyes like dilapidated walls. Ice did not do this.blue-hills-2-fileminimizerIf you follow the Linings through the woods at Blue Hills you will often come across what look to be megalithic size markers, Standing-stone scale slates or boulders that seem almost decorative, or for marking the territory. Take a look at this 7 foot long, 1 foot thick, slab placed along the Lining by one of the lower trails. It looks to be at least 1 ton in weight (2000 pounds). There are cuts on the lower right side of this slab rendering some kind of meaning. It was clearly placed there. It may mark a certain point of the Sun or Moon along the mountainside, or be indicating a direction to follow, all of which are possibilities that the Megalith builders were absolutely concerned with.

dsc03798-fileminimizerElevated Trails at Blue Hills: People from this area of New England love hiking here. With all the stonework taking place beneath the trees, it is impossible for a hiker not to be curious what might be taking place at the hilltops, under the Sun. There are trails that loop in a lengthy approach to the smooth stone porches above, but there are also very direct trails with serious inclines that will take you to the best peaks within 15 intense minutes. One peak has a direct view of Boston twenty miles away, with beautiful, Celtic looking, old growth fauna along the ledges (Image below). You can just make out Boston in the distance.worthy-boston-fileminimizer Along these smooth rock porches are stones that are obviously crafted, and serving as markers of some kind. Take a look at these stones on the upper path of “Skyline Trail”, the most popular trail at Blue Hills: dsc03887-fileminimizerThis stone is clearly crafted. Furthermore, looking from this exact stone down the direct path of the trail, are two more crafted, free sitting boulders, perfectly aligned like 1,2,3. 

aligned-heights-and-markers-fileminimizerAround this area are also stones that have clearly been cut away from cliff faces. Take a look at these triangular stones, still standing near the exact indents from which they were cut away from. tri-alter-stander-fileminimizerJust for clarity, I highlighted this image so you could see the exact spaces of the cutting, and the right angled triangle stone.alter-rear-marked-3-animated-fileminimizer This is evidence of extremely intelligent craftsmanship, conscious of geometric principles. There are also more minor cuts in the stones along the trails, with triangular features. Below is just one example of thousands. They seem directional. animated-tris-fileminimizer Amazing. The view from the top of Skyline Trail is a classic New England picture. The shadows on the dark granite ledges give a bluish hue to the stones, most likely where the name for this beautiful place derives (top images). We should remember also, that these trails were used by the Native American tribes for thousands of years, before it became “New England”. For the most part, they have taken their sacred knowledge with them into history. Take a hike through the Blue Hills, and see for yourself the unspoken reasons why a community of poor colonial farmers risked their lives against the greatest empire the world had ever known. They knew what we are quickly forgetting, that something entirely mystical took place on this sacred land. Find it, if you can, and go strong.dsc04139-fileminimizer

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October 25, 2016

Monument Mountain

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peaks-1-fileminimizerLocation: Great Barrington, Massachusetts/USA

Elevation: 1,642 ft

Note:   Monument Mountain is a rare natural gem for Massachusetts. It is not connected to the rolling hills of eastern New England, but rather the beautiful Berkshire Mountain range, which runs through the southwest corner of Massachusetts, before continuing northwest into New York State. In early November the hillsides around Monument Mountain practically glow from the morning frost in the Sunrise, giving it a unique New England appeal…berkshire-frosts-fileminimizer From top to bottom, massive shelves of white-quartzite line the mountainside, with jagged cliffs looming hundreds of feet above the trails, leading to what is known as ‘Squaw-Peak’. Alternative trails are known as “Indian Monument, and”Hickey Trail”, but are both essentially part of the same loop leading to Squaw Peak. As hard as it might be to believe, this is the Macchu Piccu of Massachusetts.beautiful-fileminimizer        The trails here lead through glades of old growth forest and quartzite glens. There are White Pines, Hemlocks, Maples, and Birches in the elevated areas, that change the feeling of the trail as you go. The forest is a barrage of overgrowth and ledges, with craggy shelves at every turn.dsc01035-fileminimizer  Some fixtures were obviously toppled by a glacial game that was played over 10,500 years ago, while other stones do not seem random at all.

The Solar Stones: The initial trail runs through a glade of towering Pines for about a half mile. Soon you will encounter an incline in the path that will lead you into Birch groves, baby Pines, and stony footing. As the trail to Squaw Peak begins to elevate, there are stairs that are clearly cut out of the mountain, leading up to smooth rounded porches.dsc01118-fileminimizer On these porches are stones that have specific angular cuts that are pointing directly at the Sun at mid-day. These stones appear at other sites in New England too. The image below is a prime example of the Solar Stone type at Monument Mountain, approaching Squaw Peak. Before coming to Monument” I had found several stones that were cut exactly like this, shown below. I felt that if stones were cut specifically to be “pointing” at something significant, it would most likely be the Sun. So on this day at Monument Mountain I tested my theory. I climbed to reach Squaw Peak just before Noon, and using this method I came across this exact stone, which points directly at the Sun at Noon. These are the moments that hikers live for. Trail features become both an exploration into natural beauty, and anthropological. Standing there, as the Sun was directly above this stone, I felt as if I was momentarily peeking through a keyhole connected to a culture from the beginning of Time. The “Solar Stones” geometry is essentially: a single long-side leading up to a 45 degree angle, which is then cut, creating an arrow head, or apex, pointing straight up; Then the cut goes back down 45 degrees, to a shorter side, which runs parallel to the long side. These cuts are made in solid granite. Take a look below…  aligne-1-noon-fileminimizerIf this were the only stone that I had seen like this, then I would hesitate to publish it here, but I offer some other examples of beautifully cut Solar Stones with the exact same angles and features. dscf3076-1-fileminimizerThis Solar Stone pictured above is located near one of the most significant “Celtic style” alter’s in New England: the Heath Alter, of Massachusetts. Notice the identical angles.dsc01086-fileminimizer Here again is a Solar Stone with the exact same measurements at a different location.dsc01205-fileminimizer We can at least conclude that whoever created these stones had a sense of ‘symbolism’, which in this case, was to convey how important they felt the Sun was, and that they were very much in tune with its properties.dscf4139-1-fileminimizer As you continue hiking along, the elevated stone porches emerge (image above) which head directly towards Squaw Peak. Your first clearing will arrive facing north-east, and its phenomenal.wide-skylignment-fileminimizer

Aligned Stones: The edge of this porch has several stones that are centered and aligned with the massive square tower that stands almost 1000 feet high in the distance. This ledge also seems to be aligned to the peak of the mountain just beyond.wide-skylignment-2-marked-2-fileminimizer If it weren’t for places like Macchu Piccu, where stones are aligned in amazing ways at high elevations to mountains and peaks, something like this would certainly seem impossible. But notice the stones running in a straight line directly down the center of this porch, with tops that are squared perfectly with each other, as if leveled intentionally. Makes you wonder. What could possibly have done this? (left image) This is the magic of Monument Mountain’s porches.

Pattern Stones: Along the trail at Monument” you will also see a type of stonework that fits a specific pattern. This can also be found at other sites in New England. Here is an image of a long singular megalithic slab specifically placed above three smaller supporting stones. Below this are other spots at Monument”, and other places in New England, with the same dimensions of: the long slab on top, with the three smaller below.Diamond x This is easily something you might pass by, believing it to be simple glacial displacement, but have a look at some other patterned stones in New England that fit this exact design.Diamond xxMini dolmen1mini dolmen 4

Interestingly, over 2000 miles away, there are Dolmens in Ireland that, in profile, fit this is exact numeric design: one long slab over three lesser stones This example is significantly larger, which is the Gaulstown Dolmen, with a capstone weighing 6 tons, suspended roughly 6 feet in the air. Diamond xxxThis relationship of 1 over 3 seems to be significant for these fixtures, and for the moment we can only guess at the significance of this.

After continuing along the porch away from the north-east alignment you will find Squaw Peak, which has a wonderful 360 view of the river valley. On a clear day distant peaks cut the clouds at a distance. mountains-in-clouds-fileminimizer Monument” trails also sponsor some of the more common megalithic features found at places like Mount Monadnock and  Mount Watatic. There are classic stone-linings that run straight up the mountain…dsc01045-fileminimizer and the mysteriously cut “X” sections, that produces the diamond shape stones that appear all the way into Maine and New Hampshire.dsc01118-1-fileminimizer All of these are found here at Mounument”.diamond-3-fileminimizer Give yourself an entire day to search out the pathways that lead through this wonderland in south western Massachusetts. Feel the texture and absolute smoothness of the creases in these megaliths as you go. This is an absolutely wonderful hike that stretches for about 4 miles along the larger picturesque loop. Someone loved and appreciated this place in ways we are only just beginning to understand. See it for yourself, the sooner the better.dsc01158-fileminimizer

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October 18, 2016

Upton Massachusetts/USA

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look-out-rock-upton-fileminimizerLocation: Town of Upton, Massachusetts

Note: In Upton Massachusetts The Blackstone Valley sponsors a full-spectrum ocean of foliage in the Autumn season.autumn-canopy-new-england-fileminimizer This is a classic New England hamlet that feels more like a rural village sitting just off the Ring of Kerry, rather than central Massachusetts. celt-marsh-new-england-fileminimizer Natural features of the town include a State Forest with roughly 7 miles of trails, with other minor trails leading to stellar places like Look Out Rock (top image). Upton offers-up an “Old World” aesthetic with some very real historical substance, containing one of the finest Wedge Tomb’s in the world, known as the Upton Stone Chamber (image below).chamber-fileminimizer The scale of the Upton Stone Chamber is very similar to the Stone Chamber at the top of the sacred Hill of Tara in Ireland.tara-1-fileminimizer The stonework of the Upton Chamber is exquisite, with dry-laid corbel roofing that opens up from an entry passage into a 15foot dome, crafted into the Earth! The roof has four 5 ton slabs holding up the passage leading to the mini-dome.orbs-upton-cairn-best-image-fileminimizer This is of the same style of roofing that was used, on a more massive scale, at New Grange, Ireland, the oldest megalithic site in the World (right image).dsc01869-fileminimizer When I entered the Upton Chamber and turned to take pictures, orbs started floating around.(left image) (Click it to look closer). There is energy in these chambers. In general, these are some pretty strong stylistic connections to some very significant places, for just a simple small town in New England. stonework-celt-forest-fileminimizer Just like in Glenveagh National Park, Ireland (left image), Upton has unique and complex megalithic stones that are beautifully mingled into various features of the landscape, with stone-linings that are much larger than Celtic linings (2nd and 3rd/left images/Upton).mountain-foliage-fileminimizer Massive granite boulders are stacked near peaks in the area, and all throughout the elevated trails. Some boulders, however hard it is to believe, seem to have been molded to imitate, and align, to the center of significant peaks in the distance.dsc04048-fileminimizer Look Out Rock is an amazing example this, with three parallel grooves carved into its face, seemingly calling attention to the boulder. It points, like an arrow, directly to the top-center of the mountain in the foreground, creating a kind of prismatic display (right image).upton-wall-fileminimizer  From an anthropological standpoint this is significant information, indicating  that this  culture was clearly “symmetry conscious”, and not only that, but symmetry capable. They could make it happen. Scope and scale of megalithic work by a culture that is capable of these statements should be reconsidered entirely to understand what is actually taking place. The neolithic culture in Upton, and all over New England, could craft granite boulders like a modern carpenter crafts wood. Forest floors in Ireland and New England look to be made up entirely of granite scraps that are cut from the larger boulders, eventually placed as statements further up the various mountains. This is the reason we find so many stones on elevated trails that have obvious cuts, right angles, and squares. The Blue Hills in Massachusetts (below left), and Mount Bearnagh in Ireland (below right), are prime examples of this. The trails in these sacred places are lined with the scraps of “megalithic carpentry”. If we were to look at the angles of the scraps on the floor of a carpenters cutting-table, the pieces, on their own, are a disheveled mess which doesn’t make any orderly sense, but the significance of each little piece is that they stem from the cutting of a ‘larger block’ on the table.dsc05005-fileminimizerblue-hills-magic-fileminimizer The angled granite scraps are the overall proof that craftsmanship took place. Entire trails are lined with scraps of angular granite cuts throughout Ireland, Wales, England, and New England. Returning to Upton,  a New-England style Dolmen sits just thirty yards from the peak at Look Out Rock. This is also a trait of sacred neolithic places. Wedge Tombs and Dolmens are often just out of view from the most advantageous spots of their specific site, very much like hikers and campers keep a tent out of the wind fairly close to the beautiful spots they want to photograph and camp near.dsc01996-fileminimizer-fileminimizer The Wedge Tomb in the heights of Glenveagh Forest, just like Look Out Rock, is centrally aligned to the mountain in front of it, with a Dolmen tucked just 30 yards from the best vantage in Glenveagh National Park. (image on right/Glenveagh Wedge Tomb). Something’s going on here. The boulders on this unique Dolmen (Image below) are cut utilizing massive and graceful lines, with long square boulders fit into each other, balancing perfectly into what looks like a primitive pyramid. The Stones are obviously cut. This Dolmen utilizes a ‘scale-scheme’ with the larger lower boulders, leading up to the smaller capstone at the top (image left).alter-fileminimizer-1 It is an incredibly thoughtful looking structure. In scale (not style) it is very much like the massive Proleek Dolmen in Ireland, which also shows nearly miraculous scale, and balance.proleek-fileminimizer(right image). Interwoven into the old colonial town of Upton, there are ledges with massive megalithic fixtures, huge quartz streaks and balanced boulders. The geological explanation for these features just doesn’t make sense. Scientists usually impose some theory of how glacial ice exploded, or slid, in a certain way to make events like this happen, but it just doesn’t hold up logically. Take a look at these massive quartz parallel shafts, with a free sitting boulder cut and inserted into the underside of the ledge. The boulders may have been cut with the intention of having the quartz grow into the parallel gaps, which reveals an amazing comprehension of how quartz responds to granite in certain positions and places. I wouldn’t put this capability past the megalith builders. It seems that they had total understanding of how to use the landscape, and had the power to mold it as they saw fit. Conceptually, it breaks our reality wide open.  alter-tower-fileminimizerThere are stone-linings so massive in Upton, that they look like they were intended to be walked ondscf2620-fileminimizer (image left below). Stone-linings literally converge on a Wedge Tomb at Glenveagh National Park from three directions (bottom image) (Click to look closer). These are all indicators that these stones were being used as energy harnesses, connecting features in the landscape, transferring energy from the Sun, to the stones, into the chambers. The entire town of Upton is sitting on a geologically engineered landscape. Take the trails through Upton Forest in October for a ‘fantastic full spectrum’ experience, and hike up to Look Out Rock to see for yourself the aligned ledges and Dolmen. This is truly a sacred and enchanted place in the heart of New England, comparable to any Celtic site. Seek it out.3-ways-fileminimizer

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October 03, 2016

Watatic Mountain

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watatic-blue-fileminimizerLocation: Ashburnham Massachusetts, U.S.A

Elevation: !,831 feet.

Note: Massachusetts is a haven for the ‘small mountain’ experience, with most trails peaking under 2,000 feet. For hikers with the right vision, the experience on the trails is by no means small, however. A mysterious megalithic culture existed once on the rocky peaks, pine forests, and hilly river-valleys of this area. Strongest similarities show up across the Atlantic in the ancient Celtic elevations. The climb to the top of Watatic Mountain will grant you a great view of the State of Vermont to the north. In Autumn it is a visual miasma of colors, increasing the value of the trail exponentially. The main trail is called Nutting Hill, which is just over three miles long, half of which is just about straight up, so be prepared. The megaliths are here too, making this an anthropological experience. To begin, at ground level a set of small ponds accept the run-off from the mountain. The rocky mountainside deflects the wind coming from the north, stilling the ponds surface like glass as you pass by.dsc01882-fileminimizer  The level portion of the trail, just past the water, is only about 150 yards. Immediately strange stone fixtures protrude through the leaves all around. Among these fixtures are more significant signs of “signatures”, or specifically stylized workings in the stone. The ‘X’, or “diamond cross-section” is one of the most popular types.

dsc01843-fileminimizerdsc01781-fileminimizer

To look at these “X” sections it is nearly impossible to believe that they were created by ‘glacial displacement’. They create symmetries not only on the stones that they are carved into, but also in the stones within the vicinity of that particular signature. They are found on almost every Massachusetts trail where there is significant rock formations, both in the heights, and valleys.dsc01805-fileminimizer They are also found in the Celtic heights of Ireland.mourn-x-fileminimizer One possibility about the meaning of the “cross section” is that it is a type of utility that insures that if the section is cut, regardless of size, the remaining pieces will fit together if used to build other structures, such as stone-linings (“walls”), dwellings, or irrigation stones. Several examples of this “X” cross section from Watatic are shown here above, as well as one from the heights in the Mourn Mountains in Ireland (right).  Before ascension on the trail begins, a classic megalith in the form of a smoothly split boulder, roughly 10 to 15 tons in weight, sits at the base of the mountain, like a gateway. The stone path literally passes straight through this massive cut boulder.boulder      If you stop to examine the area around this megalith, you will find several “cross-sections” waiting to be observed. Continuing, as you begin to climb, a beautiful old-forest glade of pines emerges, and the path becomes wider and rockier. For roughly a mile you will work your way through these pines. Interestingly enough, it is not until you reach about 1,400 feet in elevation, that a “stone-lining” emerges.dsc01788-fileminimizer This particular “stone-lining” is another strong piece of evidence against the idea that this type of feature is not a “wall” by any means. It became clear that this feature ran circularly around the dome of the mountain, like a crown on a head. No colonial farm has ever existed at the top of this fairly narrow set of circular porches at Watatic Mountain, where there is no elevated water reserve or pasturing possibility. The case for this being the work of a colonial farmer marking off his territory is illogical. It would be a triply arduous task for any laborer to first gather enough semi-megalithic size stones to lay a three foot high, two foot thick, pile of massive cut rocks around the full circumference of the mountain, at an elevation of about 1,400 feet.crown-fileminimizer There are no signs that these stones were quarried at the top of Watatic, so they must have come from below.  From below, after being crafted, piled, and gathered, the stones would have to be CARRIED UP, AND ALL THE WAY AROUND THE PEAK at an incline of roughly 60 degrees. If a laborer did manage to achieve this impossible feat, actually laying the stones, which weigh anywhere from 50 to 700 pounds each, it would take them a lifetime. Colonial living is an essay in practicality. Labors in Colonial times were conserved to efforts that yielded real sustenance, like digging wells for water, building barns for dairy and protein conservation, and clearing fields for crops. Building a stone wall for no reason around a mountain-side at 1400 feet, where there is no pasture, but only rock, would have been illogical, wasteful, and impractical to the point of preposterous. Something else is going on with these megalithic stone-linings. In places like Cavan Burren National Park in Ireland (Shown in green/right),stonework celt forest (FILEminimizer) as well as the Blue Hills in south-east Massachusetts (Shown in red and orange, below/left), and the Mourn Mountains in Northern Ireland (Shown in green/left)mourn-ancient-lining, stone lining seem to be energy connectors, or containers of energy in certain spaces.linings-fileminimizer All of these linings are at significant elevations, and are not capable of containing any kind of herds; And this is what is happening at 1,400 feet on Watatic Mountain. Whoever set the stones in place wanted us to understand that the space created within the circle is a sacred energy center, charging the elevated dome of the Mountain with subtle energies. Continuing on again, after passing this 1,400 feet mark, your path will follow the stone-lining for about 100 yards until you cross-over into this special zone. At 1,650 feet there is  beautiful Celtic style standing-stone just off to left of the path.img_1164-fileminimizerdsc01869-fileminimizer It stands 6 feet tall, and perhaps 7 feet in width, with a distinctly cut ‘face’ supported by a rotund rear side.dsc01868-fileminimizer This exact style of “cut-facing with “rotund-rearing” can be found in a gorgeous diamond shaped, white standing-stone, along the castle trail at Glenveagh National Park in Ireland, (shown here in the next two images below).img_1165-fileminimizerdsc01973-fileminimizer

It is impossible to miss the distinctness of the “face” side with the “supporting rounded-rear side” in both stones, and therefor the similarity in craftsmanship. This is pretty solid evidence that the designers of these standing-stones had almost exactly the same knowledge about crafting them, as if they were from the same culture, although separated by an ocean. This is where the story of the Nephilim, as the first anthropological society on Earth, becomes relevant. Obviously the standing-stone at Watatic is so weathered by thousands of years of foliage layered on its distinct face, that it is practically camouflaged into the overgrowth, covering what looks to be pink granite beneath the grime, as opposed to the marble clarity of the Celtic stone, that has not experienced New England foliage. dscf4813-fileminimizerThe standing-stone indicates, especailly at such an elevation, that this was once an incredibly endeared and valued space to whoever inhabited it. Finally, a quaintly cut-stone staircase climbs up to the last portion of the heights.watatic-celt-path-1-fileminimizerHere you will arrive at a grand porch with a 360 degree view. The rocky trail continues to a larger secondary porch, 50 yards south, lined with pines and rounded granite floors.watatic-fileminimizer It is well worth the effort to reach the top. Watatic is an essential “small mountain” experience in Massachusetts, literally crowned by ancient megalithic stones. Take a day and see for yourself, you won’t be disappointed.dsc01851-fileminimizer                       stony-fileminimizer

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