Stonestrider

Seek and Find The Sacred


January 15, 2021

Shenandoah National Park

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Elevation: 4000 ft

Location: Stony Man Mountain/Blue Ridge Mountains 

Note:  The world is on Lockdown # 3. I’m not sure about the strength-of-logic that these continued Lockdowns hold, if the first 2 didn’t work at all. I also think using the term “Lockdown” is about as culturally sensitive, and constructive, as potentially calling current world populations ‘prisoners’. Why are we using prison rhetoric for a medical problem? That’s just the tip of the ice-berg. 

  I did not start this Website as a political platform, and I won’t start now. Let it suffice to say that America is about to enter a truly dark period, and I will have nothing to do with it. I am getting prepared, mentally, and physically, for what’s coming, and you should too. First priority, get outside. Second priority, stay focused on the things that you can control, and let go of the things you can’t.  Third priority, continue quests and goals in your life, and never become accustomed to living vicariously through vacant pro-athletes, vapid celebrities, and demonic politicians. Live your life. Fill it with captured moments, and discoveries, and show the world. You are every bit as alive, and valuable, as any of the various idols I just mentioned. 

My life, as my down-to-earth readers know, is my family, education, Ecology, and mystery of the  Megalithic Culture. The mystery of Anthropological Geology and Megalithic Culture is truly magical, and worthy of a life-time of serious investigation and discovery. As I approach the completion of my Master’s Degree in Ecology and Sustainable Engineering from Unity College in Maine, I want to continue to relate hard-fought discoveries, and evidence, to anyone who loves the garden-like relief of forests and mountain ranges, along with the mysterious ancient stone-temples they ensconce.

The chill of New Hampshire in January can be challenging for cross-training hikers and mountain climbers. Temperatures reach into the teens, and below zero, making megalithic-mountain research a dangerous endeavor, even for experienced climbers. I brainstormed less dangerous possibilities this month; North America is massive continent; So, go where the cold isn’t. Enter the possibility of: Virginia.

With my job at a standstill due to Covid, I made my move, and drove 550 miles south, to the Shenandoah Mountain Range of Virginia. After winding my way down the East Coast, past the dystopian nightmare of New York City in the distance, and the social dumpster-fire of Washington D.C, I finally entered the dimension that is Virginia. It was gorgeous for January. (So much so, I found myself thinking that a good first-novel title could be aphoristically titled: “January in Virginia.” 

 With temperatures at 45-50 degrees, and the Sun shining, I cruised into the hidden caverns and valleys at the heart of Virginia. It is literally a golden zone of hidden valleys, crafted by the massive parallels of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Within those outer parallel shafts, other peaks ripple massively in an asymmetrical miasma that crafts miniature valleys within valleys below. 

The entirety of Shenandoah National Park can be driven on the single Highway known as Skyline Drive, running straight through the Blue Ridge. There is a $30 entry fee at the elevated entrance of this incredible Park, and then you are set free to choose a trail. There are dozens of forest-trails and peaks to choose from along Skyline’. I had read some interesting commentaries about Stony Man Mountain Trail, a 4000 foot peak about half-way up Skyline Drive, where the stones have been noted by hikers as having interesting fixtures and shapes, depicting a “man in the mountain“. That was the place for me. I immediately I was struck by what I saw. There was magic in this place, right from the start. 

Note2: Stony Man Mountain: One of the major themes of Stonestrider.com is identifying unique and sacred zones that distinguish themselves through Anthropological Geology. These vast rocky cultural zones show practically impossible fixtures of stone(s), found in finely focused areas. There are serious  mathematical patterns and indicators within these fixtures indicating an intended meaning, rather than merely random glacial spasms. The beginning of the Trail leads directly into an explosion of mossy green stone fixtures, with a straightforward path.The golden-brown wintery haze of leafless trees and soily hills in the vast lower valleys below abruptly changes into a temple of mossy megalithic stone, beginning just off Skyline Drive. Virginia very suddenly looks like New England, or Northern Ireland. The stones seem to always converge, almost manically,  at the peaks of Ranges all throughout the Western Hemisphere.  

There are also indicators for alternate meanings literally etched into the overall pathway, leading to the peak. Imagine the shape of a spiral, carved into the mountain, radiating centrally from the peak, like the shape of a conch sea-shell. The phenomenon of thresholds appear here at Stony Man’. These are specifically sized, and lined, linear stone markers, placed in a planned ratio of size scale and space. This pattern creates what appears to be levels of a spiral path, purposefully written into the Mountain. Below is an image of the first threshold at Stony Man’. Notice that the stones are fitted, and quite large, against the reference of my foot.  Roughly 150 yards further up the Trail, and almost 35 feet higher in elevation, is as second threshold, with stones roughly 1/3rd the size larger than the stones of the previous threshold. (Image/Below) 

This pattern continues, increasing in terms of size, scale, and distance, with at least 7 more thresholds winding up the Mountain. The point of acknowledging these thresholds is to recognize that the megalithic stones of these sacred peaks seem to be relating specific meanings and fixtures of stone on a grand scale. For emphasis, thresholds are also found along sacred peaks at Monument Mountain in Massachusetts, Mount Katahdin Maine, Clark Peak in the Rockies of Colorado, Rocky Woods in Massachusetts, Mount Bearnagh in Ireland, and The Half Dome at Yosemite. This is a consistently identified megalithic event of a specific crafting type, other than ‘linings’ and Dolmens, that appears to be indicating a mathematical marking of the landscape, towards the peaks.

There also appears to be collections of crafted-stone, fixtures carved distinctly into the stony ramparts of the hillside. Just as it is with many of the megalithic stones of Greece and Egypt, there seems to be a molten shaping of these long linear stones, as seen below. The heat it would take to congeal, and then craft these stones, is technologically intense, and extremely hard to justify, if the proof of the stones were not directly before us. This appears to be exactly what happened: Molten heat for mingling the stones, then crafting of long linear interlinking pieces. 

I have seen similar fixtures at the peak at Mount Bearnagh. As you can see below, at Mount Bearnagh’s peak the stones appear to be randomly stacked at first glance, but a closer more considerate glance, reveals crafted indented intervals of markings that measure the fixture. Also note that the measurement is not inches, or centimeters. It is some other system, entirely. 

Continuing along the Trail at Stony Man’ there are other crafted fixtures that seem to have meaning. Several stones seem to have been crafted to indicate the directionality of the Sun’s route across the sky. These identically fixed and cut boulders that eternally depict directional apexes, seem to be pointing to the point of the setting Sun in the skyline. (Image/Below)  

I came across stones very similar in form in New Hampshire just six months earlier: (Image/Below) At the half way point of the Trail,  an incredible outlook appears on a high cliff facing cardinal South.  All of Virginia is laid-out before you, like a golden-fleece flowing low, and lovely, into the distant ground level beyond.   The Trail continues at a comfortable incline back into the upper forest, and into the upper 3rd of the Peak. Consistent with the pattern of ‘intensified stone statements, the higher you go’, there are what look like sets of fixtures, craftings for sitting in specific positions, centrications, and cliff supports made of overflowing stacked-stone.  

As you ascend through these incredible caverns towards the peak, the Trail takes on a magical cinematic look, with a glowing frost fixed to the fingers of the thousands of branches above. 

This upper Trail reminded me of the scene at various points of Monument Mountain in Massachusetts, where outlooks just off the main trail emerge just before the peak. The path to these porches look like magical frost portals lit by the Sun. 

The inner thickets also have this glowing quality:

Here, at the vista just before the Peak, the view is stellar, with domes of frost folding over hundreds of times, into the Shenandoah Valley. (Image/Below)

There are crafted megalithic indents on these stone porches as well: (Image/Below)And just 50 yards beyond this vista, is the Peak. (Image/Below)There also appears to be a stone design at the Peak porch, looking back at the Mountain path: (Image/Below)

In my single experience at Stony Man Mountain I did not find specific standing-stones, or the typical cross-sections (X) I am accustomed to finding, cut into the stone. I believe that with more time to study Stony Man’ these specific markings could be found. Still, this Trail and Peak is clearly and suddenly inundated with distinctly crafted hillsides of Celtic looking stone, entirely different from the soily persuasion of the overall Valley. (Image/Below) 

It is a strong possibility that thePeak at Stony Man’ was sanctified by craftsmanship, and among the earliest forms of functional temples mingled into the landscape itself, as in New England, Ireland, Massachusetts, Sardinia, Wales, Colorado, Maine,  Greece, Spain, Peru, and many more places besides.

I recommend hiking this Trail in Autumn if you can, but even in Winter, it surprises even a seasoned climber with elements of unpredictable beauty. In this place, recharge, get away from the fake news-cycle, and pray for protection in the coming days. Just beyond the boarders of these vast views of Virginia, in Washington D.C, a haunt of vipers and spiders are now dropping the most massive iron-curtain upon freedom loving humans in the history of the world. Reject them. Continue to cross-train in the hills and peaks of the Ranges of the world; Breath deep; Think bright thoughts, and pray for the United States of America, and the World, to overcome this new evil . And as always, do what you need to do, to go strong.

Love and thanks to dear friends Kathy and Paul, who helped make this much needed venture possible, with a beautiful homestead to stay in Virginia, 

Please send any comments, or thoughts to: jpv@stonestrider.com. 

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August 27, 2020

Mount Moosilauke

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Elevation: 4,805 ft.

Location: The White Mountains/Benton, New Hampshire/USA

Introduction: Welcome to the dramatic western edge of The White Mountain Range, in New Hampshire/USA!

Mount Moosilauke (Moos-ih-lahk-ee) retains a title given by the Abenaki Native American Tribe; It means: “Rocky face above the trees”.  As we will see, the high place at the top of this Mountain, is a definitive and distinct megalithic spiritual zone, where the enchanted stones of the peak mingle intimately with the clouds.

This unique title given by the Abenaki, also indicates a deeper meaning, beyond the name itself. Almost every one of the many White Mountain Peaks has a ‘rocky face above the trees’. Mount Washington, Mount Chocorua, Mount Adams, and Mount Jefferson, all have a ‘rocky face above the trees’.  Why single out Mount Moosilauke? There is something special going on here. 

I believe that The Abenaki were acknowledging this particular ‘rocky-face’ due to the many unique features that they encountered, and considered spiritually significant when they first saw it. In our time, we see them as Neolithic anthropological features, so ancient, that it seems clear to me that they were there before the Abenaki people had arrived. I can support this with evidence. Let’s take a look at the multi-layered experience of megalithic evidence during this phenomenal climb at Mount Moosilauke. 

A Note About ‘Culture’: The ancient stone works found at Mount Moosilauke  pre-date the Native American Tribes of New England. The Neolithic Culture you are about to experience on Mount Moosilauke, through this article, created monumental works of stone, in extremely difficult locations, and ways,  all of which existed long before any Native American tribes had arrived. 

This Megalithic Culture has specific memes (symbols), fixtures (arrangements of stone), and structures (functional centers, small temples,) in the highest elevations all over the world, that mirror, and mimic directly with European Megalithic memes, fixtures, and structures, entire continents away. This would support the idea of a single Megalithic Culture, with a single, common, source of systems. Not hundreds of individual, nomadic, Native America Tribes; Each with its own traditions, with basic tools, and migrations that moved seasonally in the valleys, planting crops, hunting, and fishing game.

I understand that this is very hard for many local researchers to accept, defending the idea that Native Americans created these Neolithic statements; but the evidence and cultural history clearly, and definitively, indicate otherwise. Of course, that statement must be supported with the evidence. So here is yet more evidence, and common Megalithic memes, and structures, from Mount Moosilauke, in New Hampshire, that relate directly to Mountains in Ireland, Arizona, Maine, and other sacred locations and high elevations, thousands of miles away; All these locations crafted in challenging, sophisticated, Megalithic stone.

Ancient Megalithic Memes in New England: Walking along the forest streams of the Franconia Notch Range, some 6 miles west of Mount Moosliauke, just a day before my intense climb, I came upon a six foot tall, equilateral-triangular standing stone, set perfectly in the midst of a quiet stream near Route 3. 

The meme of Megalithic-stone-equilateral-triangles in the Forests of New England, from Massachusetts to Maine, and everywhere in between,  is one of the most prevalent and abundant symbols/memes that can be found. On this website alone, there are compiled, and permanently documented, several dozen equilateral triangle memes cut in massive stone in the wilderness.

These stones have significant ‘directionality’, and meaning,  yet to be fully understood, or even acknowledge by current anthropology. Academics want us to believe a glacier created these statements? I’m sorry to be blunt here, but how intensely-stupid do these current Post-modern anthropologists think we are? Not to mention the fact that I have NEVER ONCE encountered, in any of the mountain ranges I have climbed, in the entire Western Hemisphere, a single real-time Anthropologist, or Professor, in a DECADE.

Very soon, these arm-chair-anthropologists, that dispute the Megalithic memes, are going to be absolutely disproven, and in the most blatant scientific way possible. With EVIDENCE. The evidence is mounting, and couldn’t be any clearer, that these are intentionally crafted, Megalithic, Neolithic-Period works.  So, lets take a look at some examples: 

The green equilateral triangle stone pictured in the above image, has a perfectly cut, flat face, standing ten feet high. It might weigh 100 tons. I said 100 tons! It LOOKS LIKE AN ANNOUNCEMENT! BEGGING TO BE NOTICED!  THEY ALL DO! It is located in the immense Forest surrounding the sacred Mount Katahdin, in Maine.

The perfectly equilateral stone pictured to the right, is located in a beautiful Forest in Upton Massachusetts. This example is relatively small compared to many of the other statements, at about 3 feet, on each side. It is absolutely set to a stone below it. You could not budge this stone with all your strength. The point is, someone crafted it, fixed into the rock-face below, perfectly, with a tool capable of doing so, cut directly out of the rock. Look at it. It’s perfect.

To add to this Neolithic context, not far from this very spot, is a megalithic chamber, designed in the the exact same internal, structural-fashion, as the Megalithic Chamber at New Grange. An inside (and outside) that most sacred Megalithic chamber at New Grange is….yes, you guessed it, dancing equilateral triangles, cut into the stones.

 

(Images of triangles: Above/Right/Left: New Grange Megalithic Temple, Ireland. One of the oldest in the world.)

The image below is yet another massive crafted equilateral triangular-stone, found in the Forests of Maine, near Katahdin. Notice the moss covering this stone. For this stone to be cut, and then so covered with moss in this way, means it has been like this for an extremely long period of time; most likely, the very beginning of time, not crafted in the last 500, or even 1000 years. More like 6000 years…

 

Pictured here, to the right, is another cut, equilateral triangular stone, that is not located in the forest of Maine, but rather, in the forests of Austria. Again, notice the similarity to the stone in Maine, 2500 miles away. And also, notice the indicator of construction in antiquity, alpine moss. 

This stunning image to the right, was sent to me by my friend, and researcher, Gunnar Hiptmair, who continues to discover dozens of Neolithic anthropological statements and zones in the Austria and the Alps today. His Facebook profile can be reached directly, here: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100010469927936

Stemming from this, are countless other examples of equilateral triangles fixed into stone, in New England, and elsewhere. They are so abundant that it suffices to leave these examples to get the point across, and continue forward with the experience at Mount Moosilauke.

Logic About Constructing Megaliths: The ashlar-cut technology in creating these perfectly cut, flattened frontal faces of stone, does not indicate a technologically primitive Native American or Celtic culture(s). These stones were cut, and placed, in specific ways, weighing up to 50 to 100 tons. For Native tribes to move each one, would take a set of completely illogical circumstances, requiring human labor, a time frame, resources, and out-and-out permanence and dedication, that Native American or Celtic tribes would have found absolutely repugnant, annoying, and even ridiculous. 

The Winter season in New England is long, deep, and hard. When Spring arrived for the Native tribes, after surviving the deadly Winters, do anthropologists actually think and defend the idea that the very first thing Native Tribes would do after migrating back to the newly warm northern temperatures is, first: go straight back to those impossibly massive stones that they were supposedly moving, before the previous Winter began, (utilizing every ounce of energy, and voluntarily-primitive ingenuity they had) They would immediately abandon their villages, loved ones,  and their potential planting/fishing season, and crops, all to move giant rocks?

No. This never happened. It is absurd.

Something else is going on.

This is where things become extremely difficult for local researchers. They are limited to local narratives, local evidence, and local History. They simply cannot comprehend any possibilities outside of the Native American presence. They are forcing a narrative to credit Native American Cultures with the crafting of these megalithic statements, because it is the limit, contextually, historically, and logically, to what these local researchers can understand. 

The fact is, there was an earlier Culture, in the Americas, as well as Europe and Israel, as described in every ancient account, and mythic history, which was dominant in these regions of the world. They were Megalithic builders, capable of incredible works of strength and design, that are so permanent,  they are still around for us to see today. Let’s turn to the hiking experience for the moment, and move forward with the evidence at this beautiful Mountain.

Hiking Experience And Evidence at Moosliauke: As it is with every serious climb, you need to make sure you are prepared. This is a 4,805 foot climb. Please make sure you are being honest with yourself about how healthy you have been in the last year. Have you been eating right? Are you rested and calm? Have you been training for a tough incline for a few months previous? Do you have a portable water strainer to use in the flowing streams along the trail? And will you be ready to carry your portion of bottled water up the Mountain, on your back? Remember, you need to be hydrating, little by little, the whole way, up, and back. Like myself, you can bring a fully charged iPhone for safety purposes, and music. Bring some kick-ass headphones, and deepen your experience in portions of your climb. Choose a day with good weather, starting as early as possible, with the cool temperatures in the morning, and off you go.

Glencliff Trailhead: Glencliff Traihead, in Glencliff New Hampshire, is located on the ‘Benton State Forest’ side of the Mountain, known as the westerly approach to the peak. From Highway 25 in Glencliff , you will connect and turn right onto High St. You will see Mount Moosilauke to the right. The small trailhead sign, and sandy-square parking lot,  about 1.5 miles down the country road on the right. If you reach Glencliff Elderly Home beyond the Trailhead, you’ve gone to far. Turn back, you’ll see it. 

Making your way into Glencliff Trailhead, this lower 3rd of the Mountain takes you across a stream, a wide, open wild-field, and into a steady incline of a fairly wide, softened dirt trail in Benton State Forest.

There is a distinct rocky trail that emerges as you steadily make your way up the path. Curiously, the stones seem funneled, collected specifically, in one distinct lining. It is clear that the stones are not sprawled out, as if by a rolling glacier. Stones are collected in one distinct line, straight through the Forest. Although it may be hard to consider for some, this is not random, or the work of The Park Service. As we continue up the Trail, evidence to this effect will emerge. 

As the elevation increases the alpine aspects of the Trail emerge, with glowing mossy enclosures and tightening thickets of trees, growing right over the stones, in the cooler temperatures. 

Here is strong natural evidence for the chronology of the ecological process in this area, dating all the way back to the beginning of time, if you know how to look, ecologically.  It is abundantly clear, as you can see in the image above, that the geology, the rocks, were in the initial layer of the landscape, first. The forest clearly came long after. 

It is a challenge to established how many thousands of years the stones here sat without overgrowth on the open face of the Mountain (like they do in most Celtic Ranges). But it is clear that the Forest, in most areas, has grown up directly over the stones, as we see in the image above.

Please pay attention to the following ecological and anthropological points:

As you can see from the clear grey color of the stones on the pathway, there is no moss at all. This is because alpine moss is extremely sensitive to the touch, and will dissipate growth when contacted externally. The grey stones along the path look to have been ashlar-cut, and worked, distinct from the mossy stones that literally surrounding them. Notice how the pathway stones, the cut stones, have zero amounts of trees, or moss, on top of them? How is that possible? It is because from the earliest possible time, before the Forest had even grown over the rocks here, these stones were touched, and cut specifically as an approach to the peak? Yes.  This is an intended pathway of Megalithic construct.  It has remained as such, in use by the Native Culture that came long after, as sacred trails, continuing into modern use today. 

Just think for a moment. Did the Native Americans cut the pathway stones on these mountains?

They didn’t claim to, so no. Did the Park Service use machines or tools, up to 4,805 ft, to literally cut chronologically related, and level boulders, into flattened halves specifically for stepping up the Mountain? And did they cut down all the trees along the way too? Or was the path always like this, from the very beginning? Please believe me when I tell you, readers and friends, that it would cost millions of dollars in this little country Town, to do such a thing. That never happened. This path, and the hundreds of stony mountain ashlar-cut paths in the Western hemisphere, are specifically crafted, by a Megalithic Culture; a Culture that was gifted technologically, and  intent on possessing the Mountain, leaving codes of craftsmanship, from the beginning of Time.

I know this is intensely hard for laymen, and local researchrs to consider, with a locally controlled, “post-modern”-emphasized, public education system, that literally is designed to keep your mental framework historically revised, disconnected from any terrestrial evidence, and ignorant of what actual elite scientists, ecologists, antrhopologists in the government, and Universities, are well aware of.  The evidence, scientific, chronological, and logical, indicates a highly advanced Megalithic Culture at the beginning of Time. The Native Americans, and Celts in Europe, knew these constructed paths and stoneworks were present long before they arrived. Just like Peruvian Inca Natives at Machu Piccu, the Megalithic works were there when they arrived. Natives had nothing to do with constructing them.

Hiking The Trail: Continuing up theTrail, you should take your time. You will pass two streams running across the path. Pause and take water here, cool off. Jump in! Fill your water bottles. From here, there is no more running water, and you will be on your own. The pathway in the upper 3rd of the Mountain begins to narrow intensely (Image/Above).

Alpine Pine Trees will begin to enclose the stone-steps before you. Here is a chance to pause, speak to the endearingly cool people that are coming and going along this path. While making big climbs, hikers often think and say things that are not common to their lives down below. It may be cathartic for you. Hikers might be needing to get a feeling, or statement out, especially during covid19’s quixotic grip on our society at the moment. Listen to what people are saying. Be kind. These moments could be profound. Singular elevated pathways like this are rare moments in your life. Pay attention.

As you breach the narrow path of the Pines, looking to your left. You begin to realize just how high you’ve climbed. (Image/Below) This is just a preview before completely breaking the tree-line. On a good day, visual potential could be up to 70 miles away, maybe further. Pause and realize, you’re doing a great job. 

Things start to become pretty special as you continue the quest to break the alpine tree-line. The singular stony path ultimately ends, and you reach a stellar area of level ground with a crossroad of signs. There is the choice to head towards the South Peak, which is 20 minute interlude path to making the actual peak. Make sure you have the energy to take this 20 minute diversion to the view at The South Peak. I did not. I followed the sign pointing to the left, towards Moosilauke Peak.

The pathway here is magical. The relief and surprise of level ground after so much climbing is almost hilarious. It feels easy. This is a high porch, a singular pathway, like a rolled-out soily-soft-carpet, just for you to now come into this upper kingdom in the clouds that you’ve worked so hard to see. You can speedily make your way along the last 1.5 miles of your trek. 

Along this rare level path, you can try to gather your strength. Take your time and enjoy what you’ve earned. It’s the same in life. Don’t go passing by quickly, what took a hard fight to find.

Along this regal and rare path, small stones begin to emerge. The stones are intricate, enchanted, and strange. They seem to be cut in a refined fashion. I have seen this manner of cut before. Take a good look at these stones. I am willing to bet, that digital analysis of these stone would reveal linearity, symmetry, modeling, and meaning. I am currently working on an ecological analysis system of these rare fixtures. The possibility that this is a miniature map, or modeled version of the overall area, is very real. As we will see, modeling the Mountain Range of the area was an essential practice for the Megalithic builders, in New England, and Europe.

Aside from these theoretic connections, there is a location in Massachusetts that is one of the most sacred groves in the entire world.  it is called ‘Bears Den’. At this location there is a hidden waterfall, with a dwelling near by. The entire area seems to have been engineered by a Megalithic builder. There are cut stones, leveled platforms, and the waterfall itself, which is engineered and dedicated, in stone, to (you guessed it) the equilateral triangle.

Images of the rear-side of the waterfall reveal some pretty incredible markings. They will look familiar to you now. Lets have a look at the markings in the rear of that altar. Look at the similarity of these small cut fixtures.

   As I mentioned, on the frontal side of this waterfall, there are, etched in permanent stone, undeniable anthropological evidence of the equilateral triangle meme of the Megalithic Culture. 

There it is, again. Perfectly etched in stone. The Equilateral Triangle. Do you think a glacier did that? If you do, then you need to think about how much of your thinking, is someone elses influence.

When are local researchers going to understand that the implications for this clear, and sometimes multi-layered Megalithic evidence, is far beyond the potential of any local nomadically oriented tribes, that have long since vanished? There would be literally millions complicated tools, and an emphasized ‘stone orientation to’ Native-American Culture, beyond anything that we know of them, if  infact they constructed these works. They simply could not have done it.

Continuing passed many of these wonderful markings, the path unfolds into a miniature valley, leading up into what looks like a distinctly separate, miniature alpine-mountain. You’ve broken the tree-line. Here before you is what looks like a version the Sacred Mount of Arunachula in Southern India. The majesty of this 4,500 foot piece of elevated earth, is stellar, supreme, and absolutely sacred. 

This zone is protected by the State for its ecological rarity, but in truth, I believe that at the elite level, there are individuals who know that this area is a sacred anthropological zone. The stones here are doubly significant in meaning, compared to the moss.

The approach to the peak is pristine. In every direction, mountains and clouds.

The trees fade out, while stone Cairns line the path. I believe these Cairns are Megalithic statements, perhaps refined by hikers in the last Century, but more likely crafted in antiquity. These Cairns are found even at minor peaks in the hill country. 

Certain stones along the final approaches at sacred mountains are cut with directionality, pointing directly to the peak. Here is a centrally placed directional stone, directly along the path, just before the peak. Perhaps it will help if readers can see some examples of this Megalithic meme on other locations.Directional stones have specific parallel sides, leading up to a right-angle-apex of exactly45 degrees.

Sample 1:  The image above, as you know, is located near the peak at Mount Moosilauke, New Hampshire. Sample 2: Directional stone located near The Altar at Heath Mass.

Sample 3: Located near the peak at Watatic Mountain, Massachusetts.

Sample 4: Located near the peak at Monument Mountain in the Berkshire Range.

Finally arriving at the peak, people are resting and taking in the scene. A large square stone sitting at the very peak is marked with a perfect equilateral cross-section, supported by a triangle in the lower corner. (Image/Below) These particular meme can also be found at dozens of peaks throughout New England, the American West, and Europe. Here are just a few examples below the one here at Mount Moosilauke.   

After this stone, the entire White Mountain Range comes into view. In the image below, Mount Washington can be seen in the distance, the highest point in the center. Mount Chocorua can also be seen to the right, below. Stunning. 

The view to the south, as seen below, is a rolling and rotund descent, with Massachusetts off in the descending peripheral distance.

Another interesting fixture here at the peak is a very special arrangement of stones, with a leveled rock layer at the base of these specially stacked rocks, seemingly made specifically to imitate the cut of the mountain-tops, in the secondary background, of the peaks in the greater distance. Although dozens of people sat here at the peak, not one of them noticed this incredible fixture. Notice in the image below, the leveled work in the bottom portion of the rock, with what looks like distance markings of measure along it’s side. What is this doing at the top pf 4,805 foot mountain? This is no accident. These massive stones are placed to mimic the peaks in the secondary distance. 

Let’s show another location that displays this type of fixture in Europe. At the peak at Mount Bearnagh, in The Mourn Range of Ireland, the peak contains a set of megalithic fixtures that absolutely imitate the peak of the mountains beyond. The stones are clearly cut, and fixed, into positions to imitate the angles of the ledges beyond. Again, this is clearly no accident, it’s incredible engineering, in stone. Here is a megalith also located at Mount Bearnagh in Ireland, absolutely crafted to imitate the curvature of the lower valley. At the peak, just one mile from this spot, the boulders are arranged to mimic the mountains of the Range beyond. There is no way that this is random! It’ s intentional, and cultural. How could we not see this!?

Other examples of stones-marking of peaks, at other mountains, can be found at Mount Katahdin, near the Knifes Edge approach. Look at this exquisite marker, roughly 5 feet tall, pointing directly to the peak in the distance. 

Here is a specifically crafted and placed-megalithic boulder, on the edge of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, in a lake, and shaped to look exactly like the mountains behind. Notice the 3 distinct indents in the boulder as well…

And here is a megalithic boulder at small peak at Upton Massachusetts. It is imitating the small mountain beyond, pointed perfectly to its center. Notice again, 3 distinct indents on the boulder. 

Not two miles from this very beautiful spot in Upton, is one of the finest megalithic chambers in all of New England. To think that these megalithic works are not related would be a serious mistake. They are absolutely related. The Culture that created these works was obviously capable of megalithic design, and large scale. 

The accumulating Megalithic evidence here at Mount Moosilauke, with multiple supported examples from other locations, of memes and fixtures of the exact same stylization, should begin to give serious academic pause for those who have not had the capability to see this evidence, but are now clearly seeing it collected here. Site after site, peak after peak, from Glenn Coe Scotland, to the Sierra Nevada, (and everything in between) are consistent similarities of a single Megalithic Culture, not variations of statements from hundreds of Native Tribes, both Celtic, and American. The evidence point to a Culture that had a singular source of related concepts.

The final Megalithic constructs statements here at the peak of Mount Moosilauke, are perhaps the most important. We find nothing less than an entire complex of leveled stones, stacked into defined sections, spanning perhaps 70 by 30 yards. In its current state it is dilapidated, but a closer look reveals definite distinction, and intended design.

There a several divided  square sections of cut, stacked, and leveled stones, which appear to define a particular function within. The section in the image below is absolutely level with the dramatic skyline to the north. There are clearly long and level cut stones worked into this construct, as can be seen, and were most likely crafted specifically for this purpose.

A frontal view of this square space reveals a significant 7 foot high lining of stone, which has clearly been tampered with over time, without any real protections. This particular view shows the significant amount of substance that this Megalithic Chamber once contained. 

In stark contrast to the square spaces, there is a rounded space, separate from the main constructs, that may have had an alternate purpose, with its alternate shape.   This rounded setting immediately reminded me of another set of rounded Megalithic stones,  found in a highly megalithic area, and at a significant elevationm in the Mourn Mountains of Ireland.  (Image/Below) These areas should absolutely be considered National Heritage Sites and archaeological zones, fully acknowledged as a Megalithic Cultural spaces. And yet most passersby simply believe them to be random piles of rocks. How this is being allowed to remain the case is beyond me. There is meaning and intent attached to every one of these works, yet to be understood by so many.

For day hikers, the journey is only halfway done at the peak.

After resting, you need to steadily make your way back down the Mountain. When you make it to the first bubbling stream of water, about 1/3rd the way down, to refill your bottles with your strainer, you will be safe for the rest of the journey. During a trek along a decline, be careful to set your feet squarely, to choose your steps, in order not to turn your ankle. As you make your way, the path will widen, and inevitably drift with the gravity back to the Valley below. I hope hiking sojourners decide to try this climb for themselves, and experience what has been described here. Don’t let anything stop you from continuing to seek out sacred landscapes; Not others, not yourself, and not Covid19, in all its bizarre quixotic strangeness. So many people are waking-up, and truly realizing, that time in the Sun, and in the sacred landscape, is the answer. Thanks for reading. 

 

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