Stonestrider

Seek and Find The Sacred


December 05, 2016

Skyrim

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img_1263Location: Skyrim

Note: During the winter of 2014 in New England, 107.6 inches of snow fell around Boston. An Arctic weather system blasted the entire east coast of the United States for six months straight. Temperatures dropped to an average of 30 degrees, and many times as low as -14. Massachusetts declared a state of emergency.  Public transportation and public schools were closed. Piles of snow reached 15 feet high on every street corner, and the snow was level with the windows. It was grey and dark everyday. dsc04159-fileminimizer It was a full Arctic winter. Take a look at my home in this picture. Finding things to do inside became a real challenge. Reading is healthy but can get boring after a few hours each evening. Going on-line is fun, but  it can give you a headache after extended periods as well. As the winter reached it’s peak in late January, I was going snow-blind, and stir crazy. I had become so accustomed to seeing bright-white literally everywhere, that my depth perception was completely blurry. I realized I needed to find something fun to do inside, something that involved bright colors, as crazy as that sounds. I went to Best Buy to find something playful to do. At the entrance, as if literally waiting for me, was a large poster of what I felt, at that particularly color-starved moment, was the most beautiful landscape I had ever seen. I was completely blown away. I asked the attendant about the poster. He told me that the landscape was from an Xbox ‘quest game’ called Skyrim. He told me the game was a ‘universe of landscapes’ to explore. I spent $550 as if it was 50 cents, and walked out of the store in less than three minutes with a new Xbox, and a single game, Skyrim.

Skyrim Wales style (1)

The Birth of Stonestrider: I went home and played the game. It was a Celtic fantasy ‘quest game’, with an epic interactive landscape. At this point in my life I had yet to even think of going to Celtic places, but as I played the game I began to wonder what it would be like. I am a college educated person. I have a Degree in Western Literature. I had read the essential Celtic myths, inclusive of Beowulf, Mallory’s Le Morte d’Artur, Gawain and The Green Knight, and Tolkien’s masterpiece novel The Lord of The Rings, and yet for some reason I had never galvanized my thoughts about the myths of Celtic places, and how much of it might be true. The range of subject matter in Skyrim is awe inspiring. It was obvious to me that the writers of this game did an incredible amount of research regarding Celtic myths. But the Skyrim writers went one step further and made cultural connections about mythical subjects that historians and anthropologists were embarrassed to talk about. For instance, standing stones and free-sitting boulders in Skyrim were not placed at random, presumably from glacial displacement, but were found in places specifically designated by a culture. Those designated spaces were inhabited by giants. Where did Skyrim get that idea from? Certainly not from academic history, although religious history texts have an abundance of content about giants.img_1362-fileminimizer In Skyrim there are Dolmens, Standing Stones, Cairns, Free-Sitting Boulders, and Stone-Circles, all inhabited by giants, most of which also contain astrological significance. Suddenly Astrology, History, and Anthropology were ignited in my thoughts. It seemed to me that the designers of this game were signaling something to us, saying “wake up people, something amazing happened in the world once”. They had made a seamlessly logical scenario out of the Celtic universe, the ancient and half-forgotten world that we have only guessed at in this late phase of history. I began to wonder if these themes were really out there, in the actual world. If the Megaliths were cultural, then nobody could’ve moved them. I would just have to find them if I could.  And that was my epiphany. I decided that when the snow melted, and the Spring finally came, I would go on my own real-time quest to find the Megalithic culture. Stonestrider.com would be born. My life has never been the same. I would like to use this post to just express some of the similarities between the game, and what I found in real time.

Waterfalls: Take a look at this waterfall I came across in the town of Mullaghduff, in Donegal, Ireland. It was totally untouched. No trails, signs, or markers of any kind. As far as I could tell, this Celtic waterfall was in its original state.  More fantastic for me were the stones around the main Fall, which seemed curved, and cut, specifically into place, with smoothed arches and right angles actually hanging over the water. I couldn’t see how this configuration of stones would occur naturally. Look also to the left of the main Fall, there is a completely separate stone-cut path with beautifully crafted steps funneling the water. The level elevated bedrock of the main flow of water, combined with the crafted stones which are clearly curved and fitted above it, along with the separate funnel on the left, makes this seem like an engineered area, not a glacial miracle. That’s what I believe this is, an engineered waterway. There are also free-standing boulders that look more like markers heading progressively up the mountain directly beyond this waterway, which makes the area a prime candidate for an ancient Celtic, megalithically cultural center, just like what Skyrim depicts in the game.

dscf4878-1-fileminimizerWhat’s even more interesting, is that this very real waterfall in Mullaghduff has more mysterious components to it than this very fictional waterfall in Skyrim. The main similarity between the two waterfalls is that they both focus on the idea that the water is centered and flowing through a specific, and elevated, rocky precipice, while otherwise surrounded by gorgeous grassy brush and hilly topography beyond. It’s as if both scenes are trying to tell us that something special happens at the rocky points of water-flow.like-mallughduff-fileminimizerMountain Streams: Here is a  look at a mountain stream headed towards a Celtic alter in the heights of the Black Valley in the southern portion of Killarney National Park, Ireland. Take a look at the stones on the outer edge of the run of the water. The stones are not rounded, but they’re cut distinctly, seemingly directing the water in a funnel towards the center. The most obvious example is the largest stone in the center of this image; it is clearly cut, and with the directional purpose of funneling the water inward. I would also like to point out, that if you were to follow this stream up the mountain, you will come to a massive cut alter, with Celtic rings etched in its side.

 

Dromluska-Falls-14-1024x473 In Skyrim there are waterways that appear in the elevations, and they follow the flow of specifically dotted stone paths. I really feel that the game’s engineers noticed the stony designation of Celtic waterways. Whether or not they knew that the real life waterways were in many instances engineered, is for us to decide. img_1361-fileminimizer

Celtic Rings in Stone: Here is a look at the alter to be found at the top of the mountain stream in the Black Valley in Killarney. The rings cut into it are smooth and perfectly concentric, and hardly look like the work of a chisel at all.circles-1024x876 The rings are thousands of years old and hard to see now, shown just below center of the right slab, if you look close. It is clear that this slab was carved into linear sections, and ‘squared’. Even more incredible is that its location is near the top of a mountain. None of the other stones near by look even remotely like this. One last thing to take note of in this scene is that these slabs seem to be facing directly towards the central feature of the valley beyond, which is the beautiful lake Brinn, splitting the two mountains. There is just so much to consider when looking at Celtic ruins. It seems to me that they are far more than primitive markings. There is meaning in the direction in which stones face, what they depict, and where they are found. All of this is far from primitive, it’s actually elegant.Concentrics (2) (FILEminimizer)Now here is a view of a squared stone slab with semi-concentric rings on its face in Skyrim. Yet again, the more amazing and mysterious stone, is actually the real one.img_1252-fileminimizerFree Sitting Boulders: I am sure that there are boulders that have been moved by glaciers. But I am equally sure that there are boulders that have not been moved by glaciers.cavan-fileminimizer Free-sitting-boulders can most often be found guarding areas where sacred Dolmens or Wedge Tombs are directly near by. Here is an example of a free-sitting-boulder that I came across placed 30 yards from the incredible Wedge Tomb at Cavan Burren National Park in Ireland (Image on Right, click on it to look closer/Additionally, at this Wedge Tomb, are three stone-linings all converging directly on it/the linings are energy transfers, not walls). I am absolutely certain that this boulder was placed here as a marker to display the area as ‘occupied’. I imagine that this was a fair warning, a way of saying, “if you cross this massive marker, you will have to deal with the individual who is strong enough to put this here”. Notice how the boulder is placed exactly over another granite face below it. Scientists want us to believe that this boulder came to rest exactly on top of this other rock face beneath it, moved at random by glacial displacement? The odds are beyond gastronomical. I’m sorry, but no. This is a megalithic cultural statement, a boundary, near a Wedge Tomb.cavan-burren-1-fileminimizerHere is the equivalent in Skyrim. This free sitting boulder is directly on the edge of a Cairn inhabited by giants in the game. It becomes increasingly clear that the Skyrim writers know something the general population has yet to imagine possible, or has perhaps forgotten.img_1353-fileminimizerStanding Stones: The simple wonder of standing stones can move you. Here is an 8 foot standing stone in the heights of the Conwy Valley, Wales. Again, this stone weighs at least two tons. Moving this, and to such an elevation from the valley below, would seem crazy by human standards. I believe this standing stone is another type of marker, placed by the individual(s) who wanted to live away from the common collectives of people down below, and it served as a warning to them. More compelling is the fact that this stone is 100  yards from beautiful Dolmen just down the Roman pathway. Conwy-Menir-1-1024x396 Here is an image of a nice standing stone in Skyrim with what looks like similar dynamics.

Standing Stone/SkyrimStacked and level megaliths: The most obvious and famous example of stacked and level megaliths is Stonehenge. The mystery of Stonehenge is one of the most important and fascinating in the world. There is so much that goes into creating sections like these, including grand notches that are cut and fit to be fixed into place like Jurassic Legos. To do this with sarsen stone, the hardest stone in the world, is almost inconceivable for a primitive culture at the start of history. Here is a look at just one section of Stonehenge.dsc04529-1-fileminimizerAnd here is a look at one section of an entrance to a cairn in Skyrim. Same proportions. Same idea.img_1254-fileminimizer Amazing Natural Beauty: It is so important not to forget the natural beauty surrounding the mystery of Celtic culture. Mountains and valleys are simple and worthy reasons for celebration. I just want to mix and match some actual scenes that I was lucky enough to come across, with scenes from Skyrim below.glenveagh range (FILEminimizer) The fantastic images in Skyrim should inspire you to try to climb mountains and explore valleys, however distant from you.img_1324-fileminimizer You can do it! Something tremendous is revealed when you get out and take a close look at wild natural spaces. There is a hidden megalithic culture beneath us, and in some preserved places, totally visible.errigal (FILEminimizer) The Skyrim engineers have somehow put together a vision in their game that taps into the myths in a way that is almost signaling us, warning us, that there is more going on in this world than we are being told by commercial banks, governments, and people.good-fileminimizer I would like to thank the makers of Skyrim for inspiring me to think and wonder for myself just how much of what they are proposing might be true…beauvista-fileminimizer ..which is far more than I would’ve known, had I not gone in search after the miserable winter of 2014. I will end this post with this statement: Biblical scriptures and the Dead Sea Scrolls speak of giants in the land, before, and after Noah. There are entire narratives dedicated to this premise about giants. “Seek and Find the Sacred” is not just a nifty cliche, its your personal invitation to understand the most mysterious and amazing things first hand, not relying on some other persons opinion, but developing your own. The megaliths are there, in dynamic positions, with symbols and angles, waiting to be understood. All of this takes place in a naturally beautiful, and often romantically distant places, far from the manic urban centers. You have nothing to lose by letting go, and going for it. I hope to see you out there. And however far out “out there” might be, the better. dsc02114-fileminimizer

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Avebury Stone Circle

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avebury-9-fileminimizerLocation: Avebury, England.

Note:  The broad and beautiful rolling hills southwest of London is home to some of the most mysterious wonders in the world. This designated area has a rather unassuming name, considering the undeniable mysteries it contains, known simply as ‘Wiltshire’. It could be called something more relevant, like “Temple-haven”, or “God-stone-shire”, but the humble title remains.mah045862-fileminimizer  The district of Wiltshire is basically a 50-by-50-mile zone extending from the cities of Ashton Keynes at the northern edge, down to Salisbury in the south, not far from England’s gorgeous southern coast. During the dry season in England, which is late summer, this area is host to campers, hikers, bikers, and anthropologists. Teams of hikers can be found attempting expeditions from the southern tip of nearby Cornwall, north to Snowdon Range in Wales, all the way up to Glencoe Scotland.  Many of these outdoor enthusiasts begin here, in Wiltshire. The Wiltshire hills and fields feel at least four to five times more broad then in Ireland, Scotland, or New England. In antiquity England was known as Albion, which means: “Land of Giants”, and on this wide open Celtic plain, the title seems appropriate.img_1362-fileminimizer It becomes easy to imagine giants roaming across these fields, tending flocks, roasting lamb over great bonfires, and watching the stars in the fair season, very much like they are depicted in the Celtic Xbox game, Skyrim.best (FILEminimizer) This is an extremely picturesque open space, with hedges, crops, and surviving ancient old-growth trees standing stoically against a universe of looming green fields. The fascinating, and world renown Stonehenge, is within the boarders of Wiltshire, receiving international visitors numbering into the thousands every year. However, an equally incredible and mysterious megalithic place exists just 20 miles south of Stonehenge, a place which most people don’t seem to know about, that place being Avebury Stone Circle. Avebury is nothing less than the largest stone circle on earth.dsc04585-1-fileminimizerNot only is the radius of the outer circle about a mile long, but the 98 Sarsen stones that make this circle are without a doubt the largest possible standing stones that could’ve been placed here.avebury1-fileminimizer Each stone is, at a minimum, 12 feet tall, by 3 feet in width, and some are larger. These standing stones range from 50 to 60 tons each. It’s boarding on impossible. That’s roughly 12 MILLION pounds of stone in one place. Here are some examples of perhaps the largest standing stones on earth below…avebury-fives-fileminimizer There are also two smaller inner stone circles within the overall ring, with more customary stones that are about 6 feet high and 2 foot in width, but several of those stones are now missing. Altogether, this is a grandly concentric scene, with circles within circles of impossibly placed stones, like interwoven gears in a Jurassic size clock.avebury-ones-fileminimizer A hike within these rings is a dreamlike experience. Each stone has an absolutely distinct character and individuality, unlike the sarsens at Stonehenge, which are uniform in character, most likely indicating a different meaning. Each standing stone is a type of unique masterpiece, an essay on individuality. If you study standing stones enough, it is hard not to look at people the same way, with subtle nuances and individual markings that make them unique and amazing. Incredibly, standing stones convey many such meanings like this, without a single etched word anywhere. It is simply the nature of the statement itself, the stone as an expression, that draws out our faculties to find the meaning. It would indicate that whoever put these standing stones here was, at minimum, aware of the meanings they would convey forever after. And yet there is so much mystery.avebury-fours-fileminimizer It would seem clear that each stone was chosen specifically for its attributes at Avebury. It becomes impossible not to wonder how these stones came to be here, and why each was chosen.

The amount of work that it would’ve required to move 12 million pounds of stone in the Neolithic period is incomprehensible. The undertaking would’ve cost hundreds, perhaps thousands of lives, and for several reasons. Neolithic England was a place of Celtic tribal hunter-gatherers, and these tribes would’ve guarded their territories against any trespassers or invaders with deadly force. Moving 98, sixty-ton stones, slowly across a hostilely protected landscape (perhaps with wooden rolling logs and ropes) seems totally illogical.avebury-twos-1-fileminimizer And how many miles have the stones been moved from wherever they came from? This is 12 million pounds of stone we’re taking about, so it presumably makes sense that this effort took several generations, and all of this effort just to create something for which the function is not entirely known? Pretty crazy.avebury-threes-fileminimizer Interestingly enough, if you place your hand on these stones for more than a minute, you can literally feel some kind of charge moving through them. With all the mystery surrounding this place, you could hardly be surprised.avebury2-fileminimizerAvebury is obviously a Celtic spiritual center, and one of the most important in the world. The history here goes back to the very beginning of recorded time.dsc04595-fileminimizer-1 Druids and Celtic peoples would’ve come here to perform their sacred rites. The classic medieval Tudors in the backdrop behind these ancient stones display a middle age period alive and well in the present day. It is understandable that an author like J.R.R Tolkien so adeptly created his amazing novel not far from here in Oxford, weaving very human themes into mysterious magical memes so seamlessly, influenced by places like this for certain. Avebury is a living crossroads for all of these themes.  The exact significance of the placement of these stones is not known. Like so many megalithic sites, it may well be that there are astrological/historical connections that we have yet to understand. I believe that the actual truth about who built this place, and why, is still unknown, and suppressed. If you ever get to Avebury, put your hand on one of the megaliths for two minutes, you will understand, from the subtle but significant charge that runs up your arm, that something more is going on at megalithic sites than just “big rocks in the grass”. I hope you make it there soon. Find your way.dsc04595-fileminimizer

 

 

 

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October 25, 2016

Monument Mountain

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peaks-1-fileminimizerLocation: Great Barrington, Massachusetts/USA

Elevation: 1,642 ft

Note:   Monument Mountain is a rare natural gem for Massachusetts. It is not connected to the rolling hills of eastern New England, but rather the beautiful Berkshire Mountain range, which runs through the southwest corner of Massachusetts, before continuing northwest into New York State. In early November the hillsides around Monument Mountain practically glow from the morning frost in the Sunrise, giving it a unique New England appeal…berkshire-frosts-fileminimizer From top to bottom, massive shelves of white-quartzite line the mountainside, with jagged cliffs looming hundreds of feet above the trails, leading to what is known as ‘Squaw-Peak’. Alternative trails are known as “Indian Monument, and”Hickey Trail”, but are both essentially part of the same loop leading to Squaw Peak. As hard as it might be to believe, this is the Macchu Piccu of Massachusetts.beautiful-fileminimizer        The trails here lead through glades of old growth forest and quartzite glens. There are White Pines, Hemlocks, Maples, and Birches in the elevated areas, that change the feeling of the trail as you go. The forest is a barrage of overgrowth and ledges, with craggy shelves at every turn.dsc01035-fileminimizer  Some fixtures were obviously toppled by a glacial game that was played over 10,500 years ago, while other stones do not seem random at all.

The Solar Stones: The initial trail runs through a glade of towering Pines for about a half mile. Soon you will encounter an incline in the path that will lead you into Birch groves, baby Pines, and stony footing. As the trail to Squaw Peak begins to elevate, there are stairs that are clearly cut out of the mountain, leading up to smooth rounded porches.dsc01118-fileminimizer On these porches are stones that have specific angular cuts that are pointing directly at the Sun at mid-day. These stones appear at other sites in New England too. The image below is a prime example of the Solar Stone type at Monument Mountain, approaching Squaw Peak. Before coming to Monument” I had found several stones that were cut exactly like this, shown below. I felt that if stones were cut specifically to be “pointing” at something significant, it would most likely be the Sun. So on this day at Monument Mountain I tested my theory. I climbed to reach Squaw Peak just before Noon, and using this method I came across this exact stone, which points directly at the Sun at Noon. These are the moments that hikers live for. Trail features become both an exploration into natural beauty, and anthropological. Standing there, as the Sun was directly above this stone, I felt as if I was momentarily peeking through a keyhole connected to a culture from the beginning of Time. The “Solar Stones” geometry is essentially: a single long-side leading up to a 45 degree angle, which is then cut, creating an arrow head, or apex, pointing straight up; Then the cut goes back down 45 degrees, to a shorter side, which runs parallel to the long side. These cuts are made in solid granite. Take a look below…  aligne-1-noon-fileminimizerIf this were the only stone that I had seen like this, then I would hesitate to publish it here, but I offer some other examples of beautifully cut Solar Stones with the exact same angles and features. dscf3076-1-fileminimizerThis Solar Stone pictured above is located near one of the most significant “Celtic style” alter’s in New England: the Heath Alter, of Massachusetts. Notice the identical angles.dsc01086-fileminimizer Here again is a Solar Stone with the exact same measurements at a different location.dsc01205-fileminimizer We can at least conclude that whoever created these stones had a sense of ‘symbolism’, which in this case, was to convey how important they felt the Sun was, and that they were very much in tune with its properties.dscf4139-1-fileminimizer As you continue hiking along, the elevated stone porches emerge (image above) which head directly towards Squaw Peak. Your first clearing will arrive facing north-east, and its phenomenal.wide-skylignment-fileminimizer

Aligned Stones: The edge of this porch has several stones that are centered and aligned with the massive square tower that stands almost 1000 feet high in the distance. This ledge also seems to be aligned to the peak of the mountain just beyond.wide-skylignment-2-marked-2-fileminimizer If it weren’t for places like Macchu Piccu, where stones are aligned in amazing ways at high elevations to mountains and peaks, something like this would certainly seem impossible. But notice the stones running in a straight line directly down the center of this porch, with tops that are squared perfectly with each other, as if leveled intentionally. Makes you wonder. What could possibly have done this? (left image) This is the magic of Monument Mountain’s porches.

Pattern Stones: Along the trail at Monument” you will also see a type of stonework that fits a specific pattern. This can also be found at other sites in New England. Here is an image of a long singular megalithic slab specifically placed above three smaller supporting stones. Below this are other spots at Monument”, and other places in New England, with the same dimensions of: the long slab on top, with the three smaller below.Diamond x This is easily something you might pass by, believing it to be simple glacial displacement, but have a look at some other patterned stones in New England that fit this exact design.Diamond xxMini dolmen1mini dolmen 4

Interestingly, over 2000 miles away, there are Dolmens in Ireland that, in profile, fit this is exact numeric design: one long slab over three lesser stones This example is significantly larger, which is the Gaulstown Dolmen, with a capstone weighing 6 tons, suspended roughly 6 feet in the air. Diamond xxxThis relationship of 1 over 3 seems to be significant for these fixtures, and for the moment we can only guess at the significance of this.

After continuing along the porch away from the north-east alignment you will find Squaw Peak, which has a wonderful 360 view of the river valley. On a clear day distant peaks cut the clouds at a distance. mountains-in-clouds-fileminimizer Monument” trails also sponsor some of the more common megalithic features found at places like Mount Monadnock and  Mount Watatic. There are classic stone-linings that run straight up the mountain…dsc01045-fileminimizer and the mysteriously cut “X” sections, that produces the diamond shape stones that appear all the way into Maine and New Hampshire.dsc01118-1-fileminimizer All of these are found here at Mounument”.diamond-3-fileminimizer Give yourself an entire day to search out the pathways that lead through this wonderland in south western Massachusetts. Feel the texture and absolute smoothness of the creases in these megaliths as you go. This is an absolutely wonderful hike that stretches for about 4 miles along the larger picturesque loop. Someone loved and appreciated this place in ways we are only just beginning to understand. See it for yourself, the sooner the better.dsc01158-fileminimizer

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October 18, 2016

Upton Massachusetts/USA

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look-out-rock-upton-fileminimizerLocation: Town of Upton, Massachusetts

Note: In Upton Massachusetts The Blackstone Valley sponsors a full-spectrum ocean of foliage in the Autumn season.autumn-canopy-new-england-fileminimizer This is a classic New England hamlet that feels more like a rural village sitting just off the Ring of Kerry, rather than central Massachusetts. celt-marsh-new-england-fileminimizer Natural features of the town include a State Forest with roughly 7 miles of trails, with other minor trails leading to stellar places like Look Out Rock (top image). Upton offers-up an “Old World” aesthetic with some very real historical substance, containing one of the finest Wedge Tomb’s in the world, known as the Upton Stone Chamber (image below).chamber-fileminimizer The scale of the Upton Stone Chamber is very similar to the Stone Chamber at the top of the sacred Hill of Tara in Ireland.tara-1-fileminimizer The stonework of the Upton Chamber is exquisite, with dry-laid corbel roofing that opens up from an entry passage into a 15foot dome, crafted into the Earth! The roof has four 5 ton slabs holding up the passage leading to the mini-dome.orbs-upton-cairn-best-image-fileminimizer This is of the same style of roofing that was used, on a more massive scale, at New Grange, Ireland, the oldest megalithic site in the World (right image).dsc01869-fileminimizer When I entered the Upton Chamber and turned to take pictures, orbs started floating around.(left image) (Click it to look closer). There is energy in these chambers. In general, these are some pretty strong stylistic connections to some very significant places, for just a simple small town in New England. stonework-celt-forest-fileminimizer Just like in Glenveagh National Park, Ireland (left image), Upton has unique and complex megalithic stones that are beautifully mingled into various features of the landscape, with stone-linings that are much larger than Celtic linings (2nd and 3rd/left images/Upton).mountain-foliage-fileminimizer Massive granite boulders are stacked near peaks in the area, and all throughout the elevated trails. Some boulders, however hard it is to believe, seem to have been molded to imitate, and align, to the center of significant peaks in the distance.dsc04048-fileminimizer Look Out Rock is an amazing example this, with three parallel grooves carved into its face, seemingly calling attention to the boulder. It points, like an arrow, directly to the top-center of the mountain in the foreground, creating a kind of prismatic display (right image).upton-wall-fileminimizer  From an anthropological standpoint this is significant information, indicating  that this  culture was clearly “symmetry conscious”, and not only that, but symmetry capable. They could make it happen. Scope and scale of megalithic work by a culture that is capable of these statements should be reconsidered entirely to understand what is actually taking place. The neolithic culture in Upton, and all over New England, could craft granite boulders like a modern carpenter crafts wood. Forest floors in Ireland and New England look to be made up entirely of granite scraps that are cut from the larger boulders, eventually placed as statements further up the various mountains. This is the reason we find so many stones on elevated trails that have obvious cuts, right angles, and squares. The Blue Hills in Massachusetts (below left), and Mount Bearnagh in Ireland (below right), are prime examples of this. The trails in these sacred places are lined with the scraps of “megalithic carpentry”. If we were to look at the angles of the scraps on the floor of a carpenters cutting-table, the pieces, on their own, are a disheveled mess which doesn’t make any orderly sense, but the significance of each little piece is that they stem from the cutting of a ‘larger block’ on the table.dsc05005-fileminimizerblue-hills-magic-fileminimizer The angled granite scraps are the overall proof that craftsmanship took place. Entire trails are lined with scraps of angular granite cuts throughout Ireland, Wales, England, and New England. Returning to Upton,  a New-England style Dolmen sits just thirty yards from the peak at Look Out Rock. This is also a trait of sacred neolithic places. Wedge Tombs and Dolmens are often just out of view from the most advantageous spots of their specific site, very much like hikers and campers keep a tent out of the wind fairly close to the beautiful spots they want to photograph and camp near.dsc01996-fileminimizer-fileminimizer The Wedge Tomb in the heights of Glenveagh Forest, just like Look Out Rock, is centrally aligned to the mountain in front of it, with a Dolmen tucked just 30 yards from the best vantage in Glenveagh National Park. (image on right/Glenveagh Wedge Tomb). Something’s going on here. The boulders on this unique Dolmen (Image below) are cut utilizing massive and graceful lines, with long square boulders fit into each other, balancing perfectly into what looks like a primitive pyramid. The Stones are obviously cut. This Dolmen utilizes a ‘scale-scheme’ with the larger lower boulders, leading up to the smaller capstone at the top (image left).alter-fileminimizer-1 It is an incredibly thoughtful looking structure. In scale (not style) it is very much like the massive Proleek Dolmen in Ireland, which also shows nearly miraculous scale, and balance.proleek-fileminimizer(right image). Interwoven into the old colonial town of Upton, there are ledges with massive megalithic fixtures, huge quartz streaks and balanced boulders. The geological explanation for these features just doesn’t make sense. Scientists usually impose some theory of how glacial ice exploded, or slid, in a certain way to make events like this happen, but it just doesn’t hold up logically. Take a look at these massive quartz parallel shafts, with a free sitting boulder cut and inserted into the underside of the ledge. The boulders may have been cut with the intention of having the quartz grow into the parallel gaps, which reveals an amazing comprehension of how quartz responds to granite in certain positions and places. I wouldn’t put this capability past the megalith builders. It seems that they had total understanding of how to use the landscape, and had the power to mold it as they saw fit. Conceptually, it breaks our reality wide open.  alter-tower-fileminimizerThere are stone-linings so massive in Upton, that they look like they were intended to be walked ondscf2620-fileminimizer (image left below). Stone-linings literally converge on a Wedge Tomb at Glenveagh National Park from three directions (bottom image) (Click to look closer). These are all indicators that these stones were being used as energy harnesses, connecting features in the landscape, transferring energy from the Sun, to the stones, into the chambers. The entire town of Upton is sitting on a geologically engineered landscape. Take the trails through Upton Forest in October for a ‘fantastic full spectrum’ experience, and hike up to Look Out Rock to see for yourself the aligned ledges and Dolmen. This is truly a sacred and enchanted place in the heart of New England, comparable to any Celtic site. Seek it out.3-ways-fileminimizer

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October 09, 2016

Tintagel

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dsc04738-fileminimizerLocation: Cornwall Coast, England

similar-to-heath-fileminimizer

Interlocked Standing Stones at Tintagel

dscf3102-fileminimizer

Interlocking Standing Stones in New England

Note: There are trails that can take you to Standing-Stones sitting on the tops of distant valleys in places like Wales Scotland, and Ireland. There are Dolmens and Wedge Tombs in secret hedges along river paths, hard to find, on misty rocky plateaus in regions where roads have no names. Eventually pathfinders need to make their way back from the heights to tell the tale of where they’ve been, preferably to some simple comforts, good food, warm fire, and some cheer. This is Tintagel. The countryside before reaching Tintagel is timeless, with rolling fields contrasted by the sea, and horses grazing on the heights.tintagel-fileminimizer  Tintagel is the epitome of the magical safe-haven travelers hope for, complete with an ancient Celtic castle built on a small but lofty island that looms along a 300 ft cliff reaching down to a sandy beach-bay, embraced by rocky cliffs, caves, and waterfalls.  Seldom do hiking trails include so many major features in one place.dsc04705-fileminimizer The trail for Tintagel Castle actually begins a mile before reaching the coastal scene, back in the center of the medieval town of Tintagel, which is now a beautiful bustling modern hamlet with every manor of comfort to offer. The trail literally begins from the main road in the center of town, extending down to a flowing freshwater stream with a path that leads straight to the Castle/Bay. Pass through a hilly cascade of tall grass and stony ledges that leads down to the coastal scene and gate.dsc04671-fileminimizer There is a small fee to pass the modern gate, where you are then free to make a choice of walking the elevated wood-board trail that leads over a high bridge onto the island, on which the ruins of Tintagel Castle sits, or down a winding sandy loop to the beautiful beach, megaliths, and massive rock caverns. A portion of the main gate of the castle still stands today. This is is the original Celtic entrance-way to the paths leading to the inner grounds, and around the Island.dsc04690-fileminimizer This rare archaeological site contains priceless remains of a Celtic Castle, one of the earliest Christian monastery’s in history, and Medieval period stonework. Almost every Celtic myth has origins here, including perhaps the most epic of all, The Arthur Legend. The story goes that Sir Gorlois, the Duke of ancient Cornwall, locked his wife Igrain in Tintagel while away battling for the Kingship of all England. Sir Uther Pendragon then disguised himself to look like the Duke by the magic of the legendary Druid Merlin, who lived below in the caves. Uther crossed the deep chasm of the bay on a magical mist created by Merlin. and entered the castle to conceive a child with Igrain. The child born of this intense mystical situation would be the legendary King Arthur. The myth of Sir Gawain and The Green Knight also began here. It is from this castle that Gawain sets off to find the ethereal crystal castle of the Green Knight, somewhere to the north, perhaps in Wales.dsc04703-fileminimizer In recent years archaeologists unearthed a piece of Cornish slate with a version of the name ‘Arthur’ written on it, as well as items from France, Spain, and Ireland, indicating that this was an extremely busy and successful international seaport.  These upper paths run for about a mile-and-a-half around the south-east edge of the island, with wild goats grazing, and gorgeous views of the blue-green Irish Sea.dsc04699-fileminimizer Once you’ve made your way around the Castle island, work your way down one of the most picturesque bays in England.  With the Castle ruins looming over the entire scene, it is easy to see why the ancients chose this place to live.dsc04731-1-fileminimizer Freshwater streams roll down to the beach. Massive free-sitting boulders guard the cave entrances, along with mysterious standing-stones interlocked along the beach and rocks (top images). This interlocking style is very similar to the standing stones at the sacred alter in Heath Massachusetts, across the Atlantic. The boulders are sitting above other rock faces (pictured below), and centrally to the entire scene, as if they were placed. This is, again, very similar to boulders at other megalithic sites. These are specifically placed stones that date back to pre-Celtic times, associated with giants, when England was known as Albion, meaning, “Land of Giants.”merlins-cave-dolmen-alter-stones-placed-and-fit-fileminimizer This beach is filled with white sand and mesmerizing tidal flow from the Celtic Sea, which paces everything like a hypnotic dream. You may very well find people reciting poetry about the birth of King Arthur on the beach, or getting some sun. dsc04711-fileminimizer This is a place to take your time and revel in the history and scenery. The entire excursion is about 4.5 miles worth of hiking, after making your way back to town.  The energy at Tintagel is palpable. Here you don’t just get an epic glimpse of how things once were in simpler times before the modern world had its way, you feel it.dsc04729-1-fileminimizer

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October 03, 2016

Watatic Mountain

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watatic-blue-fileminimizerLocation: Ashburnham Massachusetts, U.S.A

Elevation: !,831 feet.

Note: Massachusetts is a haven for the ‘small mountain’ experience, with most trails peaking under 2,000 feet. For hikers with the right vision, the experience on the trails is by no means small, however. A mysterious megalithic culture existed once on the rocky peaks, pine forests, and hilly river-valleys of this area. Strongest similarities show up across the Atlantic in the ancient Celtic elevations. The climb to the top of Watatic Mountain will grant you a great view of the State of Vermont to the north. In Autumn it is a visual miasma of colors, increasing the value of the trail exponentially. The main trail is called Nutting Hill, which is just over three miles long, half of which is just about straight up, so be prepared. The megaliths are here too, making this an anthropological experience. To begin, at ground level a set of small ponds accept the run-off from the mountain. The rocky mountainside deflects the wind coming from the north, stilling the ponds surface like glass as you pass by.dsc01882-fileminimizer  The level portion of the trail, just past the water, is only about 150 yards. Immediately strange stone fixtures protrude through the leaves all around. Among these fixtures are more significant signs of “signatures”, or specifically stylized workings in the stone. The ‘X’, or “diamond cross-section” is one of the most popular types.

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To look at these “X” sections it is nearly impossible to believe that they were created by ‘glacial displacement’. They create symmetries not only on the stones that they are carved into, but also in the stones within the vicinity of that particular signature. They are found on almost every Massachusetts trail where there is significant rock formations, both in the heights, and valleys.dsc01805-fileminimizer They are also found in the Celtic heights of Ireland.mourn-x-fileminimizer One possibility about the meaning of the “cross section” is that it is a type of utility that insures that if the section is cut, regardless of size, the remaining pieces will fit together if used to build other structures, such as stone-linings (“walls”), dwellings, or irrigation stones. Several examples of this “X” cross section from Watatic are shown here above, as well as one from the heights in the Mourn Mountains in Ireland (right).  Before ascension on the trail begins, a classic megalith in the form of a smoothly split boulder, roughly 10 to 15 tons in weight, sits at the base of the mountain, like a gateway. The stone path literally passes straight through this massive cut boulder.boulder      If you stop to examine the area around this megalith, you will find several “cross-sections” waiting to be observed. Continuing, as you begin to climb, a beautiful old-forest glade of pines emerges, and the path becomes wider and rockier. For roughly a mile you will work your way through these pines. Interestingly enough, it is not until you reach about 1,400 feet in elevation, that a “stone-lining” emerges.dsc01788-fileminimizer This particular “stone-lining” is another strong piece of evidence against the idea that this type of feature is not a “wall” by any means. It became clear that this feature ran circularly around the dome of the mountain, like a crown on a head. No colonial farm has ever existed at the top of this fairly narrow set of circular porches at Watatic Mountain, where there is no elevated water reserve or pasturing possibility. The case for this being the work of a colonial farmer marking off his territory is illogical. It would be a triply arduous task for any laborer to first gather enough semi-megalithic size stones to lay a three foot high, two foot thick, pile of massive cut rocks around the full circumference of the mountain, at an elevation of about 1,400 feet.crown-fileminimizer There are no signs that these stones were quarried at the top of Watatic, so they must have come from below.  From below, after being crafted, piled, and gathered, the stones would have to be CARRIED UP, AND ALL THE WAY AROUND THE PEAK at an incline of roughly 60 degrees. If a laborer did manage to achieve this impossible feat, actually laying the stones, which weigh anywhere from 50 to 700 pounds each, it would take them a lifetime. Colonial living is an essay in practicality. Labors in Colonial times were conserved to efforts that yielded real sustenance, like digging wells for water, building barns for dairy and protein conservation, and clearing fields for crops. Building a stone wall for no reason around a mountain-side at 1400 feet, where there is no pasture, but only rock, would have been illogical, wasteful, and impractical to the point of preposterous. Something else is going on with these megalithic stone-linings. In places like Cavan Burren National Park in Ireland (Shown in green/right),stonework celt forest (FILEminimizer) as well as the Blue Hills in south-east Massachusetts (Shown in red and orange, below/left), and the Mourn Mountains in Northern Ireland (Shown in green/left)mourn-ancient-lining, stone lining seem to be energy connectors, or containers of energy in certain spaces.linings-fileminimizer All of these linings are at significant elevations, and are not capable of containing any kind of herds; And this is what is happening at 1,400 feet on Watatic Mountain. Whoever set the stones in place wanted us to understand that the space created within the circle is a sacred energy center, charging the elevated dome of the Mountain with subtle energies. Continuing on again, after passing this 1,400 feet mark, your path will follow the stone-lining for about 100 yards until you cross-over into this special zone. At 1,650 feet there is  beautiful Celtic style standing-stone just off to left of the path.img_1164-fileminimizerdsc01869-fileminimizer It stands 6 feet tall, and perhaps 7 feet in width, with a distinctly cut ‘face’ supported by a rotund rear side.dsc01868-fileminimizer This exact style of “cut-facing with “rotund-rearing” can be found in a gorgeous diamond shaped, white standing-stone, along the castle trail at Glenveagh National Park in Ireland, (shown here in the next two images below).img_1165-fileminimizerdsc01973-fileminimizer

It is impossible to miss the distinctness of the “face” side with the “supporting rounded-rear side” in both stones, and therefor the similarity in craftsmanship. This is pretty solid evidence that the designers of these standing-stones had almost exactly the same knowledge about crafting them, as if they were from the same culture, although separated by an ocean. This is where the story of the Nephilim, as the first anthropological society on Earth, becomes relevant. Obviously the standing-stone at Watatic is so weathered by thousands of years of foliage layered on its distinct face, that it is practically camouflaged into the overgrowth, covering what looks to be pink granite beneath the grime, as opposed to the marble clarity of the Celtic stone, that has not experienced New England foliage. dscf4813-fileminimizerThe standing-stone indicates, especailly at such an elevation, that this was once an incredibly endeared and valued space to whoever inhabited it. Finally, a quaintly cut-stone staircase climbs up to the last portion of the heights.watatic-celt-path-1-fileminimizerHere you will arrive at a grand porch with a 360 degree view. The rocky trail continues to a larger secondary porch, 50 yards south, lined with pines and rounded granite floors.watatic-fileminimizer It is well worth the effort to reach the top. Watatic is an essential “small mountain” experience in Massachusetts, literally crowned by ancient megalithic stones. Take a day and see for yourself, you won’t be disappointed.dsc01851-fileminimizer                       stony-fileminimizer

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September 05, 2016

Stonehenge

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best (FILEminimizer)Location: Wiltshire, England

Note: Imagine yourself walking on a broad plateau surrounded by miles of grass and swaying brush. Continue to imagine that you are curious enough to seek out the best elevation among these vast fields, following the slight incline, continually heading upward. You begin to see something distinct just above the landscape, off in the distance. At about 400 feet away you glimpse something entirely impossible. There before you are several circular stone enclosures towering above you. The hallowed presentation of the area is hard to comprehend, even in broad daylight. It is not a disheveled scene, but rather, a highly organized, dynamic and symmetric presentation, like a temple. You then realize, all at once, that you may be looking at the first temple on earth. If you don’t turn away in fear, your mind, whether it is that of a passing farmer, saint, knight, Celtic king, or simple serf of times past, will inevitably reach for that first logical question asked for thousands of years before: how? How did this happen? Let’s fast forward and look at some of the modern observations. The external ring is made up of Sarsen stone, each standing 30 feet high, at 25 tons each.DSCF1569 (FILEminimizer) This exterior ring looks to be incomplete, as only 16 of the original Sarsen stones are in place, while there is a significant gap on the opposite end. Was the ring ever fully completed? If it was finished, how could some stones then disappear? A secondary ring of 43 Blue Stones are distinct but also obviously incomplete, within the larger Sarsens. Some believe that there were as many as 80 Blue Stones originally. They weigh roughly 2 to 4 tons each, and were believed to be inserted thousands of years after the Sarsens. A third set of Lintel Stones are laid across the top of the Sarsens in different areas, revealing the intended circularity of the enclosure. The Lintels are not free-sitting, but are placed into grand notches that are carved into the top of the Sarsens, revealing yet another miraculous feat of engineering, besides the placement of the stones themselves.  Lastly, at the innermost section of the rings of stone, are the five domineering Trilithons, set in a “horshoe” style configuration, including the lintels above them, weighing 50 colossal tons each.  I was lucky enough to walk the grounds of Stonehenge on a sunny day, and got the best images I could, shown here. It was just as moving to step away and see others sizing up the scene, perhaps realizing, as I did, their own humanity; Perceiving that these stones have been here long before they were born, and will be there long after they are gone.DSCF1587 (FILEminimizer) Research continues regarding the meaning of this mystical place. Recent discoveries have revealed that Stonehenge is part of a grander overall context of ‘spiritual monuments’ once built into the land. Remnants of what is now being called “Woodhenge” has been found a few miles away, built in similar fashion to Stonehenge, near to the river Avon. Compelling theories about the ancient Britons utilizing Woodhenge as a temple to the living (cultural association with wood), which moves up along the River Avon in a procession towards Stonehenge (stone being culturally associated with the dead) in a ceremonial celebration of existence, have been put forward.  Many researchers also believe Stonehenge was built as a type of ‘celestial clock’, marking the Summer and Winter Solstices for eternity.  Another feature of the area is a beautiful ten foot high Standing Stone perched roughly 70 yards away from the Sarson circle. This stone, with its nodules and indented creases, looks somehow older than the Sarsons in the distance.  It clearly looks as if it were standing guard over the area, warning passers by that the area is flat-out sacred, and to act accordingly.Stonehenge Gaurdian (FILEminimizer)  These “guardian stones” can be found near Dolmens and Wedge Tombs all across the Celtic world, standing at the periphery of sacred areas as warnings that visitors are entering a sacred space. This phenomenon exists also in New England, but in the form of free-sitting boulders. Boulders will be placed peripherally, strategically, to corner off a section of forest, cliff, or mountain plateau, in order to make passers-by aware that the area they enter contains sacred features. All of this could have originated at Stonehenge. The original myths and stories of the English country-folk say that giants are the builders of Stonehenge. Ceremonies of Celtic Kings and tribal leaders have taken place within this sacred circle for as long as recorded time has existed, including fantastic tales of Merlin and King Arthur intertwined with the history. Today it is an internationally protected historical site, with a museum and bus that runs along the hills up to the site for a ticket price. You also have the option to walk if you so choose. Stonehenge is the epitome and origin of everything magical about megaliths, once you see it, you cannot help but realize that so many wonderful things are still left to be understood. If you can, I hope you will give yourself that chance.

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August 27, 2016

Kinnitty Forest

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Kinnitty Forest (1) (FILEminimizer)Location: Kinnitty, Ireland

Elevation: 1,729 feet

Note:  If you wanted to find the geographical heart of all Ireland, working your way towards the absolute center of the country, you would inevitably arrive at the beautiful medieval town of Kinnitty. After just a momentary glimpse of this landscape it truly seems as if the countryside itself has become aware of it’s central placement as the green-beating-heart of Ireland, producing a stellar Celtic scene absolutely worthy of this title. Kinnitty Mountain, along with the old forest that runs along it’s lower valley, sits  just a half mile to the north-west of tranquil Kinnitty. Hikers can pick up the main trail into this gorgeous scene at one of the prettiest entry points in the world, behind Kinnitty Castle, built in the year 1209. The Castle remains fully functional, with fine dining, an accessible outer courtyard, and stables where horses are kept and trained on the mountain throughout the day.Kinnitty Court (1) (FILEminimizer) Headed towards the trail it feels as if you’ve walked into an epic fable, or a medieval saga. The trail begins just behind the stables beyond a small trickling stream. A stone-circle will appear on your right, just 20 yards away from the path. It is a picturesque scene, with a barn-house at the edge of the looming Wood.DSCF1447 (1) (FILEminimizer) Unfortunately, the stone circle is not authentic, and was created by a previous owner of the estate some years ago, but it’s aesthetic effect is certainly complimentary.Kinnity Stonehenge (1) (FILEminimizer)   Continuing past the sign that reads ‘Kinnitty Forest’ just beyond the circle, the trail begins to climb. With the British incursion of Ireland beginning in the 12th century, the British Royals illustrious Navy and it’s ships, as well the occupying manors and hamlets abroad, which were built in support of the Crowns `expansion’, deforested Ireland almost entirely.DSC00170 (FILEminimizer)  The upside to to this is that the remaining trees that make up Kinnitty Forest are like the regal survivors of a once beautiful era, refusing to vanish.DSCF1459 (FILEminimizer) They loom over the trail protectively with a beautiful bright milky color that shines against the glades. Continuing above the tree line, the trail begins to circle the Mountain, just to the right. In the open air and Sun, Fairy Foxgloves and Clovers appear in bright clusters. If you look down, at an elevation of roughly 1600 feet, in the most landlocked trail in all of Ireland, you will discover Seashells mingled with the stones!.DSCF1467 (FILEminimizer) How these shells came to rest at the top of a mountain is just one of many wonderful discussions you might have while strolling through this fantastic Celtic scene. The loop continues for roughly 4.5 miles before returning to the Castle grounds. There are alternate trails that continue several miles to the north-east, into the Sleive Bloom Mountain Range, if you wish to continue the experience. Kinnitty Forest trail is truly the sacred heart of all Ireland, and in every possible way. It is a priceless glimpse into the way things once were, of a quieter more peaceful time that still lingers in the hills of this Celtic place. It is my hope that whoever reads this review, and takes it to heart, will one day experience it for themselves. DSC00160 (FILEminimizer)

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August 20, 2016

Lynn Woods Trail/Secret Megaliths

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Waterside boulders (FILEminimizer) (1)                                         Location: Lynn Woods/Massachusetts/North West of Boston

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Lynn Woods/Long Piece

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Ireland/Long Piece

The beautiful trails at Lynn Woods are roughly 8 miles of preserved old forestry, centered around a crystal-blue lake. The small but exquisite area is surrounded by the little city of Lynn, north-west of Boston. Paths run along the lake to the east, or west into the forest, where after roughly 2.5 miles of elevated trail, a scenic stone tower appears on top of the most significant elevation in the reserve.  Mountain bikers, dog-lovers, and runners utilize the area to the fullest in the Summer, continuing well into the Fall, when the trees begin to glow a luminary red, yellow, and orange. Bright Birch groves emerge with swaying Maple’s and Pines that reflect off the water while trekking along.Alter Birch long (FILEminimizer) Anyone visiting this particular area of Massachusetts looking not to venture too far from Boston, but wanting to experience quintessential New England fauna and foliage, should hike right into Lynn Woods for a picturesque day.  Although signs are posted for patrons to stay on the trail, there is an abundance of anthropological statements in the beautiful stone fixtures deep in the woods, and along the lake waterline. A careful and experienced hiker can certainly take the time to appreciate some of these incredible stone fixtures that host markings with measurement styles and stone types similar to those found in the Celtic heights of the mountains of Donegal Ireland, making them potentially 4000 to 6000 years old. A marvelous long piece sits close to the water at the start of the eastern trail, among other cut stones with distinct markings. The measurements on this long piece reveal 9 spaces of smaller cuts between the longer cuts: a system based on 11 spaces as a ‘full span’. The colonial ‘foot; is not represented in these works. A fantastic crafted boulder sits just off the eastern trail directly along the waterline. It displays an enigmatic 45* degree set of linear incisions running directly across the face of the rock.Impossible-Water-Alter-1024x469 Interestingly enough, Lynn Woods is a also home to the largest Standing Stone in Massachusetts, found just a half mile into the very beginning of the trail from the parking area: take an immediate left after walking the short distance, an climb  to the very top of the hill, just outside of the woods, and you will find the Standing Stone.y1 (1) It is beautifully set standing roughly 11 feet high and 3 feet in width. I am guessing that this stone weighs at least 5 tons. Similar to many Celtic standing stones, there is a second smaller stone that was obviously cut off from the main standing piece, ‘smaller’ meaning it weighs about 900 pounds or so. It sits eternally just to the left of the megalith. For real antiquarians, in the deeper forest, there are free standing boulders and massive megalithic fixtures on the top of the rolling hills continuing away from the lake.Dolmen stacked 7 (FILEminimizer) One of the most amazing pieces in all of New England is 4 miles into the eastern trail, just to the right of the path. This massive 20 ton granite stone stands 8 feet high, and is an incredible display of precision made parallel cuts, and measuring metrics. The stone is incised through nothing less than four full feet of solid granite rock. There are mathematical statements in this stone still to be deciphered, and it is truly priceless. When considering the megaliths of Lynn Woods it has to transcend the simple label of ‘nature reserve’. Lynn Woods makes the roll of Stonestrider.com due to these obviously sacred statements of megalithic expressions, so similar to the Celtic world, making it extremely likely that they are from deep antiquity. Unfortunately, all of these stones are not even noted in New England anthropological society, until now; Yet if they were in Ireland, England, Wales, or Scotland, they would be revered and protected. This place is one of the best kept anthropological secrets in all of New England.  stoney-1-fileminimizer       Amazing-cut-Alter-1024x768

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August 19, 2016

Tully Lake/Forest of Neolithic Engineering

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DSC02115 (FILEminimizer)Location: Athol Massachusetts

Bearnagh Ancient Cut Stone 33 (FILEminimizer)

Ireland

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Tully Lake

Note: Tully Lake Trail is nothing less than a kingdom of cut stones enveloped by gorgeous old growth forest in the heart of New England. The main trail loops down along the lake for about two miles, and then back into the elevated forest for another five. It is a challenging hike in winter, but enchanting. As you begin to progress into the glades of tall pines, birch, and maple, it becomes impossible to ignore the crafted megaliths lining the hillsides. It becomes abundantly clear that whoever engineered these incredible stones wanted them to be noticed. It is a venerable masonic work area, with standing stones, cut boulders, stone linings, and ancient stone dwellings. Furthermore, the stonework is not arbitrarily placed, but is clearly set in a specific manner, although beneath a blanket of snow it is difficult to decipher on a blustery December day. The clarity of the markings on these stones is astonishing. Similar styles of measurement for the cutting of megaliths exist at Mount Bearnagh in the Mourne Range of Ireland, and also most notably in the Lynn Woods further east of here in Massachusetts. Observing the scale of what are clearly measurement markings for cutting, (which I must add is certainly not inches, but some other grand standard) allows us to consider what the craftsman of the stones considered to be ‘scale’.Athol1 And that scale is MASSIVE. The stones also reveal incredibly complicated curvatures, extremely hard to create in large granite pieces.A5 The entire forest is inundated with stone statements that cry out for observation. Consistent with other old-growth trails all over the world, this forest contains the remnants of what I believe is the one time home of the craftsman of this area. Sitting roughly four miles into the loop of the main trail, unlabelled in any way, to the right of the pathway while heading back towards the entrance, I saw an incredible stone foundation of what was once clearly someones home. This site featured a beautifully dry-laid and grand cut-stone looking to weigh at least 2 tons, embedded perfectly into the foundation. The amount of care and effort that went into placing just this one megalithic center-piece must have been challenging. With sites like this, a trail becomes a priceless anthropological zone on the level of Tollymore Forest in Ireland, and Monument Mountain in the southern Berkshires of Massachusetts.Standing Stone4 (FILEminimizer)  To find an ancient dwelling, or one definitive standing stone in a single New England forest is rare, but to find several is truly exhilarating.  Further along the trail there is a stone connected to a stone-lining (‘wall’) looking very much like a Celtic ‘directional stone’, almost identical to types I have seen in England.Leaning Standing Stone cut wall peice (FILEminimizer) Celtic areas have preserved these stones and properly noted them as important anthropological statements from a culture perhaps 6000 years in the past, but New England has failed to do so here. Ironically, this somehow makes New England’s ancient sites feel a bit more pristine than even Celtic areas that are well known, because the stones have not been touched, or even visited by anyone knowingly seeking the works of a neolithic culture. When considering that almost every massive boulder in the forest contains some form of crafting, whether it be boulders split in half, or simply marked by incisions of some type, the amount of energy that would have been put into this effort is astounding, and so worth noting. And all the time, behind fixture after fixture of colossal craftsmanship, is mile upon mile of zig-zagging stone linings sliding through the trees.Zag (FILEminimizer) Close consideration of these works reveal that these efforts are not mere random ‘holes’ in the rock, but linearly lined incisions.incisions (FILEminimizer) And cuts along the edges of these megaliths are measurements, not random markings. Some of the craft work is truly artistic, revealing a joy in the artistry. Some stones are set in pairs, others are laid out as massive fixtures, seeming to have a functional flare. Hiking through these pathways is a pure wonder that pushes the boundaries of our understanding of what might have taken place clear back to the beginning of Time.Alter Cuts and Measures (FILEminimizer) The stones themselves seem to insist that it may not be the linear evolutionary line that postmodern texts have been pushing for the last 100 years. It is clear that technology existed in antiquity, and was utilized in this incredible daydream of a forest. On an international scale of 1 to 10 for sacred forests, Tully Lake is a 15. Seek and find it out for yourself, something truly magical took place here.SS apartment (FILEminimizer)

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